Correctional Programs

Correctional programs are designed to address factors which have been linked to criminal behaviour. Offenders who participate in these programs learn and apply the skills and strategies they need to keep them from committing future crimes. These skills and strategies help them to transition into the community when they are released. A safe and successful transition for offenders means safer communities for Canadians. Correctional programs can be grouped into four categories.

We have correctional programs for:

CSC is a world leader in developing, implementing, and delivering effective correctional programs. These programs are designed to help offenders understand that they are accountable for their criminal behaviour. They help change criminal attitudes and reduce the risk offenders present when they return to society. These programs are based on research of “what works”. They target risk factors that, once changed, have been proven to reduce future reoffending.

Programs work best when offenders are in the right program at the right intensity level. CSC must assess this for each offender. Those who need more intervention can be referred to programs at a high intensity level. Those who need less may be referred to moderate intensity programs. The differences between the two include the length of the program, the number of sessions, and the lessons and materials used. High intensity programs are longer and have more sessions. To respond to the unique needs of Aboriginal offenders, CSC offers a variety of culturally-relevant Aboriginal correctional programs.

Correctional Programs for Men

A lot of effort goes into making sure that the right offender receives the right program at the right time during his sentence. It is also important that programs are offered to those who need them most.

The most recent evaluation of CSC’s correctional programs showed that these programs are successful. When offenders took part in a correctional program their rates of re-admission and general reoffending were reduced by as much as 45%. Violent reoffending was reduced by up to 63%.

Programs available for men offenders include:

Correctional Programs for Women

Women offenders have unique needs that affect the way they respond to correctional programs. CSC offers a variety of programs for women offenders. This includes programs for Aboriginal women. They are designed to address problems that are specific to women. They use a modern holistic approach and they include:

Programs for women offenders focus on helping them understand the impact of their behaviour in different situations and relationships. The goal is to help women to prepare for and build a balanced and crime-free lifestyle after their release.

Programs work best when offenders are in the right program at the right intensity level. CSC must assess this for each offender. Programs for women offenders are not individual programs. They build upon one another for different levels of intensity. Women who need more intervention are referred to programs at a high intensity level. Those who need less may be referred to moderate intensity programs. The differences between the two include the length of the program, the number of sessions, and the lessons and materials used. High intensity programs are longer and have more sessions. To respond to the unique needs of Aboriginal women offenders, CSC offers a number of culturally-relevant correctional programs.

Correctional Programs for Aboriginal Men

Aboriginal communities, Elders and national Aboriginal stakeholder groups are part of the process when Aboriginal-specific programs are developed and delivered. They recognize the social realities and context of the lives of Aboriginal offenders. The holistic approach of these programs ensures that Aboriginal offenders’ needs are met in terms of culture, tradition and spirituality.

Correctional Programs for Aboriginal Women

Aboriginal communities, Elders and Aboriginal advisory boards are part of the process when Aboriginal-specific programs are developed and delivered. They recognize the social realities and context of the lives of Aboriginal offenders. The holistic approach of these programs ensures that Aboriginal offenders’ needs are met in terms of culture, tradition and spirituality.

These programs are designed to meet the specific needs of Aboriginal women offenders.