Guidelines

National Correctional Program Referral Guidelines

PURPOSE

  • To provide a framework for referrals to national correctional programs that effectively address offenders’ risk and needs, and to assign the offenders to the most appropriate correctional programs that will contribute to their rehabilitation and safe reintegration
  • To base correctional program referrals on actuarial risk in conjunction with needs identified by supplementary assessments and/or criminal history

APPLICATION

Applies to all staff involved in correctional program development, management, monitoring, referrals and delivery

PRINCIPLES

  1. Correctional program effectiveness requires matching the intensity of the correctional program(s) to an offender's level of risk and need(s).
  2. Program intensity is generally determined by the level of risk as assessed by the Revised Statistical Information on Recidivism scale (SIR-R1) for non-Aboriginal men offenders or the Custody Rating Scale (CRS) for Aboriginal men offenders and for women offenders. For men's sex offender programs, the Static-99Rand the Stable-2007 generally serve as the determinant of program intensity for non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal men sex offenders.
  3. The combination of risk and needs determines which type of correctional program is required and the appropriate program intensity. Offenders’ correctional program needs are established in part through supplementary assessments, and a review of criminal history.
  4. In the case of male offenders who meet the sexual offence criteria pursuant to CD 705-5 – Supplementary Assessments, a sex offender assessment will be conducted prior to an offender starting a main correctional program. This assessment will be conducted by the Correctional Program Officer/Assessor and will consist of administering the Static-99R and Stable-2007 pursuant to GL 726-3 – National Correctional Program Management Guidelines. In the case of women offenders who meet the sexual offence definition pursuant to CD 705-5 – Supplementary Assessments, a psychological risk assessment with the focus on sexual offending must be made available prior to the women’s sex offender program start date. 
  5. When determining an Aboriginal offender’s program needs, the unique circumstances of the offender, including Aboriginal social history, must be considered in the decision-making process. For offenders who have expressed an interest in following a healing path, an Elder Review will be completed pursuant to CD 705-5 – Supplementary Assessments.
  6. When determining appropriate referrals to address the risk and needs of Aboriginal offenders who wish to participate in Aboriginal-specific programming, referrals to national Aboriginal correctional programs should take precedence over referrals to the non-Aboriginal correctional program equivalent.
  7. Referrals to national correctional programs should be the preferred intervention where appropriate and available. Referrals to non-standardized local or regional programs should only be used as a substitute for a national correctional program where no reasonable alternative exists. Offenders may only be assigned to one correctional program, including maintenance programs, at any given time.
  8. Correctional planning requires that referrals to correctional programs:
    1. prepare offenders for timely and safe reintegration
    2. ensure that the intensity and type of correctional program(s) selected is based on risk and need(s)
    3. for the traditional cadre of men offender correctional programs, prioritize the delivery of correctional programs that target needs linked to violence and/or substance abuse
    4. give priority to offenders serving short sentences for correctional programs at intake
    5. include appropriate culturally-based correctional programs for Aboriginal offenders who wish to participate in Aboriginal-specific programs
    6. include correctional programs designed to address the needs of women offenders
    7. be achievable and available within the length of the sentence, and take parole eligibility dates into consideration
    8. provide a justifiable rationale for any override to a correctional program, and document this rationale in the Offender Management System (OMS)
    9. consider the offender's specific physical and mental health care needs or disabilities.

RESPONSIBILITIES AND PROCEDURES

  1. The Regional Program Manager will review requests for Integrated Correctional Program Model (ICPM) and women offender correctional program overrides and provide a recommendation within four working days.
  2. The Correctional Intervention Board will:
    1. ensure that correctional program referrals adhere to these guidelines, and if applicable, the offender's Identified Program Need, prior to accepting a referral to a correctional program
    2. document override decisions and the rationale for these decisions in the Correctional Intervention Board meeting minutes
    3. ensure that Aboriginal offenders have been informed of, and are encouraged to participate in, Aboriginal correctional programs.
  3. The Parole Officer will:
    1. refer offenders to correctional programs based on the program-specific selection criteria (Annex B) outlined in these guidelines
    2. consult with Aboriginal offenders to determine whether they wish to participate in Aboriginal specific correctional programming
    3. ensure that all referrals to correctional programs (including maintenance programs) are included in or linked to the Correctional Plan, the Correctional Plan Update, or the Community Strategy
    4. submit a rationale for overrides to the Regional Program Manager or Correctional Intervention Board, as appropriate, for review when an offender does not meet the selection criteria for a correctional program but it is determined that participation in a specific correctional program is required to reduce risk of re-offending
    5. document the reasons for an override and the decision of the Correctional Intervention Board in the Correctional Plan or Correctional Plan Update.
  4. The Correctional Program Officer/Aboriginal Correctional Program Officer will:
    1. provide recommendations to the Correctional Intervention Board as required as to the appropriateness of an override
    2. document whether or not the offender met the program selection criteria, including the reasons for an override, if applicable, in the final correctional program report.

Correctional Program Referrals

  1. In the absence of the determination of level of risk and need(s) and the results from the supplementary assessments, the Correctional Intervention Board should not accept any referrals to correctional programs.
  2. Notwithstanding the above, men offenders may be referred to correctional programs, including program primers, offered at intake units pursuant to  CD 705 - Intake Assessment Process and Correctional Plan Framework. This applies, in particular, to offenders serving sentences of four years or less, where an offender's specific program needs are apparent relatively early in the intake process prior to the completion of the Correctional Plan.
  3. Notwithstanding the above, women offenders may be referred to an engagement, or moderate intensity program shortly after admission, prior to the completion of the Correctional Plan. This applies in particular to offenders serving sentences of four years or less where an offender’s specific program needs are apparent relatively early in the intake process prior to the completion of the Correctional Plan.
  4. With the exception of maintenance programs, offenders who successfully complete or attend all sessions of a correctional program are not to be referred to repeat that same program during the same sentence.
  5. Offenders with specific physical and mental health care needs or disabilities may be referred to national correctional programs if it is determined by the Correctional Intervention Board that they are likely to be able to meaningfully participate in the program. In such instances, Correctional Program Officers/Aboriginal Correctional Program Officers are expected to use existing tools at their disposition to ensure that they accommodate the unique responsivity needs of these offenders.
  6. Offenders with mental health care needs or disabilities who are unable to meaningfully participate in national correctional programs may be referred to adapted programs designed to meet their needs and/or therapeutic interventions as per their treatment plan.

Traditional Cadre of Men Offender Correctional Programs

  1. For programs other than sex offender programs, appropriate program intensity for non-Aboriginal men offenders is determined based on the level of risk as assessed by the SIR-R1, and for Aboriginal men offenders, based on the CRS.
  2. For sex offender programs, appropriate program intensity is determined based on the level of risk as assessed by Static-99R for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal men sex offenders.
  3. There are three primary areas addressed by correctional programs: violence, substance abuse, and general criminality (National Programs Descriptions).
  4. The Correctional Service of Canada offers three types of violence prevention correctional programs that are designed for moderate and high risk offenders: general, family, and sexual violence prevention.
  5. The Correctional Service of Canada's substance abuse programs are designed for moderate and high risk and need offenders whose substance abuse is directly linked to their criminal behaviour.
  6. Offenders who have completed either violence or substance abuse prevention correctional programs should generally not be referred to a general crime prevention program, unless it is determined that there are outstanding risk factors which have not been addressed.

High Risk Offender Correctional Program Options

  1. In order to be referred for participation in high intensity correctional programming, the offender must be assessed as:
    1. high risk based on the SIR-R1 for non-Aboriginal men offenders
    2. maximum on the CRS for Aboriginal men offenders, or
    3. high risk based on the Static-99R for men sex offenders.
  2. Offenders who are assessed as high risk are the priority candidates for institutional and community correctional programs, including maintenance programs.
  3. To appropriately address the needs of high risk offenders, the Correctional Plan normally requires a referral to one high intensity correctional program.

High Risk Violent Offenders

  1. For high risk offenders whose principal risk factor is violence, the priority referral is to a national high intensity violence (general, family or sexual) prevention correctional program.
  2. In order to be considered an appropriate candidate for one of the high intensity violence prevention correctional programs, in addition to having a high risk rating on actuarial assessments, an offender must:
    1. in the case of general violence:
      1. have convictions for two or more separate incidents of violence (multiple convictions for offences listed in Annex C linked to one event constitutes one incident)
    2. in the case of family violence:
      1. have a documented history of two or more incidents of violence against a female partner, and
      2. present a high imminent risk of violence towards a partner based on the Spousal Assault Risk Assessmentt (SARA)
    3. in the case of sexual violence:
      1. meet the definition of a sex offender prescribed in Annex A, and
      2. have a high risk rating on the Static-99R.
  3. In order to be considered an appropriate candidate for a moderate intensity violence prevention correctional program, in addition to being assessed as high risk on actuarial assessments, an offender must:
    1. in the case of general violence:
      1. have convictions for one incident of violence (multiple convictions for offences listed in Annex C linked to one event constitutes one incident)
    2. in the case of family violence:
      1. have a documented history of one incident of violence against a female partner
      2. present a moderate or high imminent risk of violence towards a partner based on the SARA.
  4. In cases in which the offender meets the criteria for multiple high intensity violence prevention correctional programs, the following guidelines are to be considered when prioritizing referrals:
    1. a pattern of general violence with sexual violence normally requires a referral to the national high intensity sex offender correctional program
    2. sexual violence with family violence, all committed within a family context against a female partner, normally requires a referral to the national high intensity family violence prevention correctional program or the national Aboriginal correctional program equivalent
    3. family violence in combination with a pattern of general violence normally requires a referral to the national high intensity general violence prevention correctional program or the national Aboriginal correctional program equivalent
    4. sexual violence in combination with a pattern of general violence and family violence normally requires a referral to the national high intensity sex offender correctional program.
  5. For those cases referred to above, the intensity of other correctional program referrals deemed necessary should be decreased to moderate.

High Risk Offenders - Violence and Substance Abuse

  1. In cases in which an offender meets the selection criteria for both a high intensity general violence or family violence prevention correctional program and a high intensity substance abuse correctional program, the priority referral should be based on the most significant criminogenic risk factor, based on criminal history. The intensity of the other correctional program referral should be decreased to moderate.
  2. In cases in which an offender meets the selection criteria for both a high intensity sex offender program and a high intensity substance abuse program, the priority referral should be to a high intensity sex offender program. The intensity of the substance abuse program referral should be decreased to moderate.

High Risk Offenders - Substance Abuse

  1. High risk offenders who have substance abuse identified as a need may participate in a high intensity substance abuse correctional program if:
    1. they present a high need based on the Computerized Assessment of Substance Abuse (CASA), and
    2. there is an established link between the current offence and substance abuse.
  2. High risk offenders who have substance abuse identified as a need may participate in a moderate intensity substance abuse correctional program if:
    1. they present a moderate need based on the CASA, and
    2. there is an established link between the current offence and substance abuse.

High Risk Offenders - General Crime

  1. Offenders who are assessed as being high risk and who have convictions for two or more property, fraud or drug (other than for personal use) offences are appropriate candidates for the Alternatives, Associates and Attitudes program.
  2. High risk Aboriginal offenders who are assessed as having moderate to high needs (dynamic factors assessment rating of medium or high) may be referred to the Basic Healing Program- Revised to enhance motivation, as well as address risk and need with cultural relevance.

Moderate Risk Offender Correctional Program Options

  1. In order to be referred for participation in moderate intensity correctional programming, the offender must be assessed as:
    1. moderate risk based on the SIR-R1 for non-Aboriginal men offenders
    2. medium on the CRS for Aboriginal men offenders, or
    3. moderate risk based on the Static-99R for sex offenders.
  2. To appropriately address the needs of moderate risk offenders, the Correctional Plan normally requires referrals to moderate intensity correctional programs.

Moderate Risk Violent Offenders

  1. For moderate risk offenders whose principal risk factor is violence (general, family or sexual), the priority referral is to a national moderate intensity violence prevention correctional program.
  2. In order to be considered an appropriate candidate for a moderate intensity violence prevention correctional program, in addition to being assessed as moderate risk rating on actuarial assessments, an offender must:
    1. in the case of general violence:
      1. have a conviction for one or more incidents of violence (multiple convictions for offences listed in Annex C linked to one event constitutes one incident)
    2. in the case of family violence:
      1. have a documented history of one or more incidents of violence against a female partner, and
      2. present a moderate or high imminent risk of violence towards a partner based on the SARA
    3. in the case of sexual violence:
      1. meet the definition of a sex offender prescribed in Annex A, and
      2. have a moderate risk rating on the Static-99R.
  3. In cases in which the offender meets the criteria for multiple moderate intensity violence prevention correctional programs, the following guidelines should be considered when prioritizing referrals:
    1. a pattern of general violence with sexual violence normally requires referral to the national moderate intensity sex offender correctional program
    2. sexual violence with family violence, all committed within a family context against a female partner, normally requires referral to the national moderate intensity family violence prevention correctional program
    3. family violence in combination with a pattern of general violence normally requires referral to the national moderate intensity violence prevention correctional program
    4. sexual violence in combination with a pattern of general violence and family violence normally requires a referral to the national moderate intensity sex offender correctional program.

Moderate Risk Offenders - Violence and Substance Abuse

  1. In cases in which an offender meets the selection criteria for both a moderate intensity general violence or family violence prevention program and a moderate intensity substance abuse program, the priority referral should be based on the most significant criminogenic risk factor, based on criminal history. The offender can subsequently participate in the other correctional program at the moderate intensity level.
  2. In cases in which an offender meets the selection criteria for both a moderate intensity sex offender program and a moderate intensity substance abuse program, the priority referral should be to the moderate intensity sex offender program. The offender can subsequently participate in the substance abuse program at the moderate intensity level.

Moderate Risk Offenders - Substance Abuse

  1. Moderate risk offenders who have substance abuse identified as a need may participate in a moderate intensity substance abuse correctional program if:
    1. they present a high or moderate need based on the CASA, and
    2. there is an established link between the current offence and substance abuse.

Moderate Risk Offenders - General Crime

  1. Offenders who are assessed as moderate risk and who have convictions for two or more property, fraud or drug (other than for personal use) offences are appropriate candidates for the Alternatives, Associates and Attitudes program.
  2. Moderate risk Aboriginal offenders who are assessed as having moderate to high needs (dynamic factors assessment rating of medium or high) may be referred to the Basic Healing Program – Revised to enhance motivation, as well as address risk and need with cultural relevance.

Low Risk Offender Correctional Program Options

  1. Non-sex offenders who are assessed as low risk on the SIR-R1 or minimum on the CRS and who meet the override criteria for a general violence, family violence, substance abuse or general crime prevention program may be referred to only one correctional program at no higher than moderate intensity.
  2. Men sex offenders who are assessed as low risk on the Static-99R and low risk on the SIR-R1 or minimum on the CRS may be referred to one correctional program at no higher than moderate intensity if they meet one of the override criteria for a general violence, family violence, substance abuse or general crime prevention program, or the override criteria for sex offender programs.
  3. Men sex offenders who are assessed as low risk on the Static-99R and moderate or high risk on the SIR-R1 or medium or maximum on the CRS may be referred to two correctional programs if they meet the selection criteria for a general violence, family violence, substance abuse or general crime prevention program and the override criteria for sex offender programs.
  4. Men sex offenders who are assessed as moderate or high risk on the Static-99R and low risk on the SIR-R1 or minimum on the CRS may be referred to two correctional programs if they meet the selection criteria for a sex offender program, as well as one of the override criteria for a general violence, family violence, substance abuse or general crime prevention program.
  5. In cases in which a low risk offender does not meet any of the override criteria for a correctional program, a combination of other institutional and community-based interventions deemed appropriate will be used to manage identified risk and need(s), and to maintain the low risk.

Override Criteria for General Violence, Family Violence, Substance Abuse and General Crime Prevention Programs

  1. Non-Aboriginal men offenders assessed as low risk on the SIR-R1 and Aboriginal men offenders rated as minimum on the CRS will not be referred to a general violence, family violence, substance abuse or general crime prevention program unless they meet one or more of the following override criteria:
    1. for general violence or family violence prevention programs, the commission of the offence caused death or serious harm to another person and/or there are risk factors present to believe, on reasonable grounds, the offender is likely to commit an offence causing death or serious harm to another person
    2. for general violence or family violence prevention programs, there is corroborated information demonstrating the presence of a pattern of violent behaviour not reflected in convictions and/or in the SIR-R1/CRS
    3. for family violence prevention programs, the imminent risk of violence towards a partner is moderate or high on the SARA and the offender has a documented history of one or more incidents of violence against a female partner
    4. for substance abuse programs, the offender presents a moderate to high need on the CASA and there is an established link between the current offence and substance abuse
    5. for general violence or general crime prevention programs, there is a history of significant involvement in street gangs or organized crime, as evidenced by convictions or a pattern of charges which did not result in conviction.
  2. Aboriginal social history will be taken into consideration when determining whether an override to a lower program intensity may be required to appropriately address the needs of Aboriginal men offenders.

Override Criteria for Sex Offender Programs

  1. Non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal men sex offenders who are assessed as low risk on the Static-99R may be considered for an override to a moderate intensity sex offender program if they meet one or more of the following override criteria:
    1. sex-offence related relationship problems (marked hostility towards women and/or emotional identification with children)
    2. diagnosis of an offence-related paraphilia in a psychiatric or psychological assessment
    3. two or more prepubescent victims and/or eight or more total sex offence victims (based on all available credible information)
    4. indicators of sexual deviance (evidence in a psychiatric or psychological assessment, including phallometry, and/or self-reported deviant sexual interests/preferences)
    5. for offenders in the community, the dynamic risk has been recently elevated to moderate or high in accordance with the Correctional Plan Update, and an assessment of risk on the Acute-2007 by a Correctional Program Officer/Aboriginal Correctional Program Officer also indicates that risk of sexual/violent recidivism is also moderate or high.
  2. Non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal men sex offenders who are assessed as moderate risk on the Static-99R may be considered for an override to a high intensity sex offender program if they meet one or more of the following override criteria:
    1. sex-offence related relationship problems (marked hostility towards women and/or emotional identification with children) and one of the following:
      1. for non-Aboriginal men, high risk on the SIR-R1 (-5 to -30)
      2. for Aboriginal men, maximum on the CRS
      3. for Aboriginal or non-Aboriginal men, a score of 6 on the Static-99R
    2. diagnosis of an offence-related paraphilia in a psychiatric or psychological assessment
    3. two or more prepubescent victims and/or eight or more total sex offence victims (based on all available credible information)
    4. indicators of sexual deviance (evidence in a psychiatric or psychological assessment, including phallometry, and/or self-reported deviant sexual interests/preferences).
  3. An override to a sex offender program will be finalized only following the results of the Static-99R and Stable-2007 at which time the program referral should be confirmed or modified in accordance with Annex B of these Guidelines.
  4. Notwithstanding the above, where the Static-99R cannot be scored for an offender, program intensity will be determined following the results of the Stable-2007.
  5. For overrides to a higher intensity sex offender program, the intensity of the final referral should not exceed the overall risk level of the Static-99R and the Stable-2007 combined, as evaluated in the specialized sex offender assessment.
  6. Notwithstanding the above, offenders who score low in accordance with the grid in Annex B, may be overridden to a moderate intensity program when the aforementioned override criteria is met.

Maintenance Programs

  1. Offenders who complete moderate or high intensity correctional programs may participate in institutional and/or community maintenance programs. The number of maintenance cycles required will be reflective of the offender's level of risk and need(s), as well the offender's progress in previous correctional programs.
  2. Referrals to maintenance programs will not normally be made until the offender has successfully completed or attended all sessions of a moderate or high intensity correctional program and the final correctional program report is finalized.
  3. Notwithstanding the above, offenders who are waitlisted or currently assigned to a correctional program may be referred to maintenance programs in the community via the Community Strategy completed during pre-release case preparation. In these cases, the Correctional Intervention Board should defer the referral until the offender has completed the correctional program.
  4. Notwithstanding the above, an offender who was previously assigned to, but who has not completed, a correctional program may be referred to a maintenance program in exceptional circumstances. Acceptance of the referral is at the discretion of the Correctional Intervention Board, and is only permitted when an offender has completed a sufficient number of program sessions to identify his main risk factors and develop a comprehensive self-management plan. The Correctional Intervention Board rationale for accepting the referral should be documented in the Correctional Intervention Board meeting minutes, as well as in the referral comments in OMS and the maintenance final correctional program report.
  5. Low risk offenders who have previously met the override criteria and have completed a correctional program do not require a subsequent override to participate in maintenance programs.
  6. The priority maintenance referral for men sex offenders is the national sex offender maintenance program.
  7. Sex offenders who have taken a non-CSC moderate or high intensity sex offender program are eligible to participate in the National Sex Offender Program – Maintenance provided the Correctional Intervention Board determines that they are able to benefit from participation in the maintenance program. The Correctional Intervention Board rationale for accepting the referral should be documented in the Correctional Intervention Board meeting minutes, as well as in the referral comments in OMS.

Integrated Correctional Program Model (ICPM) Men Offender Correctional Programs

  1. The ICPM cadre of programs consists of three streams: multi-target, Aboriginal multi-target and sex offender (National Programs Descriptions).
  2. The Program Identification Tool will assist staff in determining the most appropriate program stream and intensity level for each offender.
  3. In the case of ICPM multi-target programs, appropriate program intensity for non-Aboriginal men offenders is determined based on the SIR-R1, and for Aboriginal men offenders, on the CRS.
  4. In the case of ICPM sex offender programs, appropriate program intensity is determined based on the combination of the Static-99R, the Stable-2007 and the SIR-R1 for non-Aboriginal men sex offenders, and the combination of the Static-99R, the Stable-2007 and the CRS for Aboriginal men sex offenders.

ICPM Program Primers

  1. All men offenders who meet the selection criteria for participation in an ICPM moderate or high intensity program will first be referred to an ICPM program primer in either the multi-target, Aboriginal multi-target or sex offender stream:
    1. offenders serving sentences of four years or less will normally be referred to the appropriate program primer at intake
    2. offenders serving sentences of more than four years or who did not complete a program primer at intake will be referred to the appropriate non-intake program primer at the receiving institution.
  2. Offenders must complete the requisite program primer prior to participation in an ICPM moderate or high intensity program.
  3. Offenders who are unlikely to participate in an ICPM moderate or high intensity program in the near future may be referred to an extended primer, where available, to provide additional self-management skills to assist in adjusting to incarceration while awaiting program participation.

High Risk Offender ICPM Program Options

  1. In order to be considered an appropriate candidate for participation in a high intensity ICPM program, the offender must be assessed as:
    1. high risk based on the SIR-R1 for non-Aboriginal men offenders
    2. maximum based on the CRS for Aboriginal men offenders, or
    3. high risk based on the combination of the Static-99R, the Stable-2007 and the SIR-R1 for non-Aboriginal sex offenders, or high risk based on the combination of the Static-99R, the Stable-2007 and the CRS for Aboriginal sex offenders.

Moderate Risk Offender ICPM Program Options

  1. In order to be considered an appropriate candidate for participation in a moderate intensity ICPM program, the offender must be assessed as:
    1. moderate risk based on the SIR-R1 for non-Aboriginal men offenders
    2. medium based on the CRS for Aboriginal men offenders, or
    3. moderate risk based on the combination of the Static-99R, the Stable-2007 and the SIR-R1 for non-Aboriginal sex offenders, or moderate risk based on the combination of the Static-99R, the Stable-2007 and the CRS for Aboriginal sex offenders.

Low Risk Offender ICPM Program Options

  1. Men offenders who are assessed as low risk will not be referred to any ICPM programs unless they meet the criteria for an override to a higher intensity level.
  2. Low risk men offenders who meet the criteria for an ICPM override to a higher intensity level may participate in a moderate intensity ICPM program.
  3. In cases in which a low risk offender does not meet the criteria for an override to a higher intensity level, a combination of other institutional and community-based interventions deemed appropriate will be used to manage identified risk and need(s), and to maintain the low risk.

Override of ICPM Program Intensity Level

  1. In order to be eligible for an override to a higher program intensity, an offender must meet one of the following criteria:
    1. the offender's position held within a gang or organized crime suggests violence is inherent (gang information does not need to be flagged in OMS but may be supported by file information)
    2. there is corroborated information demonstrating the presence of a pattern of violent behaviour not reflected in convictions and/or in the SIR/CRS/Static-99R.
  2. An initial referral to an ICPM sex offender program may be initiated upon receipt of the preliminary Static-99R results, where appropriate. Following the final results of the Stable-2007 and Static-99R, the program referral should be confirmed or modified in accordance with Annex B of these Guidelines.
  3. Notwithstanding the above, where the Static-99R cannot be scored for a sex offender, program intensity will be determined following the results of the Stable-2007 and the SIR-R1 or CRS.
  4. For overrides to a higher intensity ICPM sex offender program, the intensity of the final referral should not exceed the overall intensity level of the Static-99R and the Stable-2007 combined in accordance with the grid in Annex B.
  5. Notwithstanding the above, offenders who score low in accordance with the grid in Annex B, may be overridden to a moderate intensity program when the aforementioned override criteria is met.
  6. In order to be eligible for an override to a lower program intensity, the offender must meet one of the following criteria:
    1. the offender is an Aboriginal offender serving a life sentence who was automatically rated as maximum on the CRS, whose pattern of criminal behaviour does not warrant a high risk rating
    2. poor physical health that is determined to be sufficient to significantly reduce the offender’s risk of reoffending or precludes program participation at a higher intensity level (e.g., significant physical disability)
    3. previous participation in an ICPM program
    4. the presence of significant factors, mitigating risk, that warrant a reduction in program intensity level.

Override of ICPM Stream

  1. In cases in which the Correctional Program Officer Assessor and the Parole Officer disagree with the ICPM program stream recommended by the Program Identification Tool (multi-target versus sex offender) or with the grid in Annex B, the Parole Officer will submit a stream orientation override request to the Regional Program Manager.

ICPM Community Program

  1. Offenders being released to the community who refused to participate in, or who were referred to and did not complete, an ICPM moderate or high intensity program will be referred to the ICPM community program.

ICPM Maintenance Programs

  1. Offenders who complete moderate or high intensity correctional programs, or the ICPM community program, may participate in institutional and/or community ICPM maintenance programs. The number of maintenance cycles required will be reflective of the offender's level of risk and need(s), as well the offender's progress in previous ICPM programs.
  2. A referral to an ICPM maintenance program will normally be to the same stream as the ICPM program the offender completed.
  3. Notwithstanding the above, the Correctional Intervention Board may approve a different maintenance stream if the offender has specific risk factors that can only be addressed through participation in another stream. When this occurs, the Correctional Program Officer/Aboriginal Correctional Program Officer will complete a transition interview with the offender in order to identify any additional personal targets that need to be addressed.
  4. Offenders who have completed a correctional program in the traditional cadre of men's programs and do not require participation in an ICPM moderate or high intensity program may participate in an ICPM maintenance program. When this occurs, the Correctional Program Officer/Aboriginal Correctional Program Officer will complete a transition interview prior to the offender's participation in the maintenance program.

Women Offender Correctional Programs

  1. Risk assessment for the purpose of women offender correctional program referrals is based on the CRS.

Continuum of Care/Circle of Care

  1. Programming is offered through the Continuum of Care for non-Aboriginal women offenders and through the Circle of Care for Aboriginal women offenders.
  2. Women offenders will be referred to an engagement program in either the Continuum of Care for non-Aboriginal women or the Circle of Care for Aboriginal women.
  3. Women offenders may be referred to moderate and high intensity women offender correctional programs in either the Continuum of Care or Circle of Care, and/or the women's sex offender program, in accordance with Annex B.
  4. For women offenders who meet the sexual offence definition pursuant to CD 705-5 – Supplementary Assessments, the psychological risk assessment with the focus on sexual offending will be available prior to the women’s sex offender program start date.
  5. Women sex offenders assessed as medium on the CRS will be referred to the women's sex offender program in accordance with Annex B.
  6. Women sex offenders assessed as maximum on the CRS will first be referred to the moderate intensity program in either the Continuum of Care or Circle of Care and will subsequently be referred to the women's sex offender program, in accordance with Annex B. The combination of these two programs is designed to target high risk women offenders.
  7. Notwithstanding the above, women offenders identified as requiring both the women offender moderate intensity program and the women's sex offender program may be referred directly to the women's sex offender program following completion of the women's engagement program if they are serving a sentence where the length of the sentence would not allow them to complete both programs.

Low Risk Women Offender Correctional Program Options

  1. A woman offender assessed as minimum on the CRS and presenting low needs will not be referred to moderate or high intensity correctional programs, but may participate in an engagement and/or maintenance program.
  2. Low risk women offenders may be considered for participation in a moderate intensity correctional program if they meet one of the following override criteria:
    1. the offender meets the detention referral criteria in subsection 129(2) of the CCRA
    2. the offender scores moderate to high need on the Women's Computerized Assessment of Substance Abuse (WCASA) and there is an established link between the current offence and substance abuse
    3. the offender is assessed as moderate to high needs (dynamic factors assessment rating of medium or high) and it is established that participation in a correctional program is required to address the offender's contributing factors.
  3. Low risk women offenders who meet the aforementioned override criteria may be referred to only one moderate intensity correctional program. The available programs include the women offender moderate intensity program/Aboriginal women offender moderate intensity program, or the women’s sex offender program, in accordance with Annex B.
  4. Low risk women offenders in the community may be referred to a self-management program if the dynamic factors assessment rating has recently elevated to moderate or high in accordance with the Correctional Plan Update.
  5. For low risk women offenders who do not meet the override criteria for participation in a correctional program, a combination of other institutional and community-based interventions deemed appropriate will be used to manage identified risk and need(s).

Assistant Commissioner,
Correctional Operations and Programs

Original Signed by:
Fraser Macaulay

ANNEX A

CROSS-REFERENCES AND DEFINITIONS

CROSS-REFERENCES

CD 700 - Correctional Interventions
CD 702 - Aboriginal Offenders
CD 705 - Intake Assessment Process and Correctional Plan Framework
CD 705-5 - Supplementary Assessments
CD 705-6 - Correctional Planning and Criminal Profile
CD 705-7 - Security Classification and Penitentiary Placement
CD 705-8 - Assessing Serious Harm
CD 710-1 - Progress Against the Correctional Plan
CD 715-1 - Community Supervision
CD 715-2 - Post-Release Decision Process
CD 719 - Long-term Supervision Orders
GL 726-1 - National Correctional Program Standards
GL 726-3 - National Correctional Program Management Guidelines
CD 730 - Offender Program Assignments and Inmate Payments
CD 767 - Ethnocultural Offenders: Services and Interventions
CD 784 - Information Sharing Between Victims and the Correctional Service of Canada

DEFINITIONS

Aboriginal correctional programs : structured, culturally-based interventions that target empirically-validated factors directly linked to Aboriginal offenders' criminal behaviour in order to reduce re‑offending. These programs’ culturally-relevant content includes Aboriginal social history considerations, traditional teachings and ceremonies, and cultural activities. Aboriginal correctional programs should normally be delivered by Aboriginal Correctional Program Officers with the involvement of Elders, and will utilize a healing and holistic approach to address the physical, emotional, spiritual and mental needs of Aboriginal offenders.

Aboriginal social history : the various circumstances that have affected the lives of most Aboriginal people. Considering these circumstances may result in alternate options or solutions and applies only to Aboriginal offenders (not to non-Aboriginal offenders who choose to follow the Aboriginal way of life). These circumstances include the following (note that this is not an exhaustive list):

  • effects of the residential school system
  • sixties scoop into the adoption system
  • effects of the dislocation and dispossession of Inuit people
  • family or community history of suicide
  • family or community history of substance abuse
  • family or community history of victimization
  • family or community fragmentation
  • level or lack of formal education
  • level of connectivity with family/community
  • experience in the child welfare system
  • experience with poverty
  • loss of or struggle with cultural/spiritual identity.

Computerized Assessment of Substance Abuse : a self-administered assessment tool that explores the nature and seriousness of an offender's substance abuse problems.

Correctional program : a structured intervention that targets empirically-validated factors directly linked to offenders’ criminal behaviour, in order to reduce re ­offending.

Correctional program referral: the means used to identify an offender for participation in a correctional program.

Custody Rating Scale : a research-based tool used to assist in assessing the most appropriate level of security for the penitentiary placement of an offender.

National correctional programs: a specific set of correctional programs that have been developed and implemented on a national level. These programs are structured interventions that target empirically-validated factors directly linked to offenders’ criminal behaviour, in order to reduce re-offending.

Override : the referral of an offender to a correctional program for which he/she does not fully meet the correctional program selection criteria. In other words, there is a difference between the offender’s level of risk or need(s) and what is targeted by the correctional program. An override may be to a higher or lower intensity program than the program for which the offender meets the selection criteria.

Program Identification Tool : an automated report which compares the offender's SIR‑R1/CRS/ Static‑99R results and number of violent offences with the program selection criteria in order to determine the most appropriate program intensity and stream for the offender.

Responsivity : the presence of a characteristic(s) that influences the offender's capacity to benefit from the targeted intervention(s).

Revised Statistical Information on Recidivism : a statistically derived tool for predicting recidivism, which combines measures of demographic characteristics and criminal history.

Selection criteria : used to identify the target population for the correctional program. Correctional program selection criteria include the level of actuarial risk in conjunction with criminogenic needs as assessed by the standard supplementary assessments or as defined by selection criteria that serve to determine the intensity level of a correctional program.

Serious harm : severe physical injury or severe psychological damage, as defined in section 99 of the CCRA.

Sex offender : a person who meets the sexual offence definition pursuant to CD 705-5 - Supplementary Intake Assessments.

Spousal Assault Risk Assessment : a structured professional judgement tool used to assess risk for intimate partner violence.

Stable-2007 : a structured risk assessment tool which identifies stable dynamic risk factors for sexual offending that are amenable to intervention. When administered by a Correctional Program Officer/Assessor, this tool is to be used only for program purposes.

Static-99R : an actuarial assessment tool designed to assist in the estimation of sexual recidivism for sexual offenders. When administered by a Correctional Program Officer/Assessor this tool is to be used only for program purposes.

Supplementary assessments : assessments designed to provide information about the nature and severity of the specific dynamic factor to assist in decision making and program referrals.

Transition interview : for offenders who have completed a correctional program and do not need to participate in an ICPM moderate or high intensity program, the transition interview replaces the need to complete a program primer prior to participation in a maintenance program.

Women's Computerized Assessment of Substance Abuse : a self-administered assessment tool that provides information related to a woman offender’s level of substance use, severity and dependence, and life areas impacted by substance use.

ANNEX B

PROGRAM - SPECIFIC SELECTION CRITERIA

Traditional Cadre of Men Offender Correctional Programs

ACTUARIAL ASSESSMENT RISK RATINGS

High Risk

Moderate Risk

Low Risk

SIR-R1 score of -30 to -5
for non-Aboriginal offenders

SIR-R1 score of -4 to 0
for non-Aboriginal offenders

SIR-R1 score of 1 to 27
for non-Aboriginal offenders

CRS rating of maximum
for Aboriginal offenders

CRS rating of medium
for Aboriginal offenders

CRS rating of minimum
for Aboriginal offenders

Static-99R score of 7 or higher for sex offenders

Static-99R score of 2 to 6
for sex offenders

Static-99R score of -3 to 1
for sex offenders

Stable-2007 score of
12 or higher for sex offenders

Stable-2007 score of
4 to 11 for sex offenders

Stable-2007 score of
0 to 3 for sex offenders

GENERAL VIOLENCE - MEN OFFENDERS

SIR-R1 or CRS Risk Rating

Number of convictions for separate incidents of violence*

General Violence Program Intensity

High

2+

Violence Prevention Program - High Intensity / In Search of Your Warrior - High Intensity

High

1

Violence Prevention Program - Moderate Intensity

Moderate

2+

Violence Prevention Program - Moderate Intensity

Moderate

1s

Violence Prevention Program - Moderate Intensity

*Multiple convictions for offences listed in Annex C linked to one event constitute one incident. Violent incidents that did not resultin convictions should not be used as a basis for referral.

FAMILY VIOLENCE - MEN OFFENDERS

A family violence risk assessment must be completed prior to referral.

SIR-R1 or CRS Risk Rating

Imminent risk of violence toward a partner on the SARA

Number of documented incidents of violence against a female partner*

Family Violence Program Intensity

High

High

2+

Family Violence Prevention Program - High Intensity / Aboriginal Family Violence Prevention Program - High Intensity

High

High

1

Family Violence Prevention Program - Moderate Intensity

High

Moderate

2+

Family Violence Prevention Program - Moderate Intensity

High

Moderate

1

Family Violence Prevention Program - Moderate Intensity

Moderate

High

2+

Family Violence Prevention Program - Moderate Intensity

Moderate

High

1

Family Violence Prevention Program - Moderate Intensity

Moderate

Moderate

2+

Family Violence Prevention Program - Moderate Intensity

Moderate

Moderate

1

Family Violence Prevention Program - Moderate Intensity

*Documented incidents includes convictions, self-report, or CSC has reliable and accurate information that an offender has committed crimes of a violent nature against a female partner, whether or not these have resulted in convictions.

SEXUAL VIOLENCE - MEN OFFENDERS

Offenders who meet the selection criteria for a moderate or high intensity sex offender program and self-identify as Inuk may be referred to TUPIQ, when available.

Static-99R Risk Rating

Stable-2007 Rating

Sex Offender Program Intensity

N/A

Low

No Sex Offender Program*

N/A

Mod

No Sex Offender Program*

N/A

High

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Low

Low

No Sex Offender Program*

Low

Mod

No Sex Offender Program*

Low

High

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Mod

Low

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Mod

Mod

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Mod (2-3)

High

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Mod (4-5-6)

High

Sex Offender High Intensity

High

Low

Sex Offender High Intensity

High

Mod

Sex Offender High Intensity

High

High

Sex Offender High Intensity

*No sex offender program unless the offender meets the override criteria for sex offender programs.

SUBSTANCE ABUSE - MEN OFFENDERS

A substance abuse assessment must be completed prior to referral.

SIR-R1 or CRS Risk Rating

CASA Rating

Established link between the current offence and substance abuse?

Substance Abuse Program Intensity

High

High

Yes

National Substance Abuse Program - High Intensity / Aboriginal Offender Substance Abuse Program - High Intensity

High

Moderate

Yes

National Substance Abuse Program - Moderate Intensity / Aboriginal Offender Substance Abuse Program - Moderate Intensity

Moderate

High

Yes

National Substance Abuse Program - Moderate Intensity / Aboriginal Offender Substance Abuse Program - Moderate Intensity

Moderate

Moderate

Yes

National Substance Abuse Program - Moderate Intensity / Aboriginal Offender Substance Abuse Program - Moderate Intensity

GENERAL CRIME - MEN OFFENDERS

SIR-R1 or CRS Risk Rating

Offence History

General Crime Program Intensity

High

Current offences for two or more property, fraud or drug (other than for personal use) offences

Alternatives, Associates and Attitudes

High

Two or more property, fraud or drug (other than for personal use) offences in the past five years before the current sentence

Alternatives, Associates and Attitudes

Moderate

Current offences for two or more property, fraud or drug (other than for personal use) offences

Alternatives, Associates and Attitudes

Moderate

Two or more property, fraud or drug (other than for personal use) offences in the past five years before the current sentence

Alternatives, Associates and Attitudes

SIR-R1 or CRS Risk Rating

Level of Intervention Based on Dynamic Factors

General Crime Program Intensity

High

High

Moderate

Basic Healing Program - Revised

Moderate

High

Moderate

Basic Healing Program - Revised

COMMUNITY MAINTENANCE - MEN OFFENDERS

Program(s) Completed

Maintenance Program

Completion (successful completion or attended all sessions) of a moderate or high intensity correctional program in the area of general violence, family violence, substance abuse, or general crime prevention

Community Maintenance Program

Completion (successful completion or attended all sessions) of a moderate or high intensity sex offender program

National Sex Offender Program - Maintenance

Integrated Correctional Program Model - Men Offenders

The Program Identification Tool considers the following referral criteria:

ACTUARIAL ASSESSMENT RISK RATINGS

High Risk

Moderate Risk

Low Risk

SIR-R1 score of -30 to -5
for non-Aboriginal offenders

SIR-R1 score of -4 to 5
for non-Aboriginal offenders

SIR-R1 score of 6 to 27
for non-Aboriginal offenders

CRS rating of maximum
for Aboriginal offenders

CRS rating of medium
for Aboriginal offenders

CRS rating of minimum
for Aboriginal offenders

Static-99R score of 7 or higher for sex offenders

Static-99R score of 2 to 6
for sex offenders

Static-99R score of -3 to 1
for sex offenders

Stable-2007 score of 12 or higher for sex offenders

Stable-2007 score of 4 to 11 for sex offenders

Stable-2007 score of 0 to 3 for sex offenders

ICPM SEX OFFENDER (ABORIGINAL AND NON-ABORIGINAL) – MEN OFFENDERS
Static-99R Not Applicable

Offenders who meet the selection criteria for an ICPM moderate or high intensity sex offender program and self-identify as Inuk may be referred to TUPIQ when available.

SIR-R1 or CRS Risk Rating

Static-99R Risk Rating

Stable 2007 Rating

ICPM Program Intensity

Low

N/A

Low

No Program*

Low

N/A

Mod

No Program*

Low

N/A

High

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Mod

N/A

Low

Multi-Target Moderate Intensity

Mod

N/A

Mod

Multi-Target Moderate Intensity

Mod

N/A

High

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

High

N/A

Low

Multi-Target High Intensity

High

N/A

Mod

Multi-Target High Intensity

High

N/A

High

Sex Offender High Intensity

*No program unless the offender meets the criteria for an override of ICPM program intensity level.

ICPM SEX OFFENDER (ABORIGINAL AND NON-ABORIGINAL) – MEN OFFENDERS

Offenders who meet the selection criteria for an ICPM moderate or high intensity sex offender program and self-identify as Inuk may be referred to TUPIQ, when applicable.

SIR-R1 or CRS Risk Rating

Static-99R Risk Rating

Stable 2007 Rating

ICPM Program Intensity

Low

Low

Low

No Program*

Low

Low

Mod

No Program*

Low

Low

High

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Low

Mod

Low

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Low

Mod

Mod

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Low

Mod (2-3)

High

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Low

Mod (4-5-6)

High

Sex offender High intensity

Low

High

Low

Sex offender High intensityy

Low

High

Mod

Sex offender High intensity

Low

High

High

Sex offender High intensity

Mod

Low

Low

Multi-Target Moderate Intensity

Mod

Low

Mod

Multi-Target Moderate Intensity

Mod

Low

High

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Mod

Mod

Low

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Mod

Mod

Mod

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Mod

Mod (2-3)

High

Sex Offender Moderate Intensity

Mod

Mod (4-5-6)

High

Sex Offender High Intensity

Mod

High

Low

Sex Offender High Intensity

Mod

High

Mod

Sex Offender High Intensity

Mod

High

High

Sex Offender High Intensity

High

Low

Low

Sex Offender High Intensity

High

Low

Mod

Sex Offender High Intensity

High

Low

High

Sex Offender High Intensity

High

Mod

Low

Sex Offender High Intensity

High

Mod

Mod

Sex Offender High Intensity

High

Mod

High

Sex Offender High Intensity

High

High

Low

Sex Offender High Intensity

High

High

Mod

Sex Offender High Intensity

High

High

High

Sex Offender High Intensity

*No program unless the offender meets the criteria for an override of ICPM program intensity level.

WOMEN OFFENDER CORRECTIONAL PROGRAMS
ACTUARIAL ASSESSMENT RISK RATINGS

High Risk

Moderate Risk

Low Risk

CRS rating of maximum
for women offenders

CRS rating of medium
for women offenders

CRS rating of minimum
for women offenders

ENGAGEMENT PROGRAMS (ABORIGINAL AND NON-ABORIGINAL) - WOMEN OFFENDERS

CRS Risk Rating

Engagement Program

Low

Engagement Program / Aboriginal Engagement Program

Moderate

High

MODERATE AND HIGH INTENSITY PROGRAMS (ABORIGINAL AND NON-ABORIGINAL) - WOMEN OFFENDERS

CRS Risk Rating

Level of Intervention Based on Dynamic Factors

Program(s) Completed

WOCP/AWOCP Program Intensity

Moderate

Low

Women’s Engagement Program / Aboriginal Women’s Engagement Program

Women Offender Moderate Intensity Program / Aboriginal Women Offender Moderate Intensity

Moderate

High

High

Low

Women’s Engagement Program / Aboriginal Women’s Engagement Program

Women Offender Moderate Intensity Program / Aboriginal Women Offender Moderate Intensity

Moderate

High

Women’s Engagement Program / Aboriginal Women’s Engagement Program
+
Women Offender Moderate Intensity Program / Aboriginal Women Offender Moderate Intensity

Women Offender High Intensity Program / Aboriginal Women Offender High Intensity Program

SEX OFFENDER PROGRAMS - WOMEN OFFENDERS

Offenders must meet the sexual offence definition pursuant to CD 705-5 - Supplementary Intake Assessments.

CRS Risk Rating

Level of Intervention Based on Dynamic Factors

Program(s) Completed

Sex Offender Program Intensity

Moderate

Low

Women’s Engagement Program / Aboriginal Women’s Engagement Program

Women’s Sex Offender Program

Moderate

High

High

Low

Women’s Engagement Program / Aboriginal Women’s Engagement Program

Women’s Sex Offender Program

Moderate

High

Women’s Engagement Program / Aboriginal Women’s Engagement Program
+
Women Offender Moderate Intensity Program / Aboriginal Women Offender Moderate Intensity

Women’s Sex Offender Program

SELF-MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (ABORIGINAL AND NON-ABORIGINAL) - WOMEN OFFENDERS

Program(s) Completed

Self-Management Program

Completion (successful completion or attended all sessions) of an engagement, moderate intensity or high intensity women offender correctional program

Self-Management Program / Aboriginal Self-Management Program

Women who require additional support and assistance while on release in the community

ANNEX C

VIOLENT OFFENCES FOR REFERRAL TO A GENERAL VIOLENCE PREVENTION PROGRAM

An offence under any of the following provisions of the Criminal Code, irrespective of whether it was prosecuted summarily or by way of indictment:.

An offence under any of the following provisions of the Criminal Code, chapter C-34 of the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1970, as they read immediately before January 4, 1983, irrespective of whether it was prosecuted summarily or by indictment:

For more information

To learn about upcoming or ongoing consultations on proposed federal regulations, visit the Canada Gazette and Consulting with Canadians websites.