Commissioner's Directive

Management of Correctional Service of Canada Volunteers

AUTHORITIES

PURPOSE

  • To provide national direction for the management of Correctional Service of Canada volunteers

APPLICATION

Applies to all individuals who are involved in the management of Correctional Service of Canada volunteers

VOLUNTEERS

  1. A volunteer is an individual who gives time to an organization without remuneration. For the purpose of this policy, a Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) volunteer is an individual who gives time without remuneration to risk-assessed, approved and supervised CSC volunteer activities and:
    1. has completed the Volunteer Application and Information form (CSC/SCC 0740)
    2. is of the age of majority in the province where he/she volunteers (see Annex B)
    3. is registered as a volunteer in CSC’s volunteer resource management database
    4. has completed CSC’s national volunteer orientation, and where required, CSC-approved training
    5. has been issued a CSC identification card
  1. Volunteers who meet the criteria of paragraph 1 above and are escorted within a facility/site, and do not have access to protected information or assets do not require reliability status, but will be considered volunteers. These volunteers will undergo a CPIC verification by completing either the Institutional Access CPIC Clearance Request (CSC/SCC 1279) or CPIC Clearance Request (Community) (CSC/SCC 1279-01).
  2. Volunteers who meet the criteria of paragraph 1 above and are not escorted within a facility/site, and/or have access to protected information or assets must receive and maintain a valid reliability status that corresponds to their volunteer activities.
  3. Volunteers managed through an organization other than CSC, as well as CSC contractors, can become CSC volunteers if they meet the requirements outlined above.
  4. Individuals who give their time at a CSC operational unit without remuneration, but do not meet the requirements for a CSC volunteer outlined above are considered visitors and subject to Commissioner’s Directive (CD) 559 – Visits.
  5. Citizen Advisory Committee (CAC) members must comply with the directives outlined in CD 023 – Citizen Advisory Committees.
  6. A student completing a practicum/placement is not considered a volunteer as he/she is fulfilling educational program requirements under a formal agreement between CSC and the educational institution.
  7. CSC staff may volunteer if they have received approval from their operational unit head or other appropriate Manager if not at an operational site.

RESPONSIBILITIES AND PROCEDURES

  1. The Assistant Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, will ensure that a comprehensive national framework for the management of volunteers is in place by:
    1. developing and maintaining policies relating to the national management of CSC volunteers
    2. implementing national reporting mechanisms for CSC volunteer activities
    3. reporting on volunteer activities to the Executive Committee annually
    4. ensuring that volunteers have a national volunteer committee and designating a co-chair for the committee
    5. ensuring that national volunteer resource management software is available
    6. developing and maintaining orientation tools and material required for CSC’s national volunteer orientation
    7. ensuring volunteers provide services in an environment that is free of discrimination and harassment as defined in the Canadian Human Rights Act and in the spirit of the Treasury Board Policy on Harassment Prevention and Resolution
  2. The Regional Deputy Commissioner will ensure that an appropriate governance structure is in place to support the coordination of CSC volunteers in the region by:
    1. ensuring that each operational unit head will risk-assess all volunteer activities prior to their commencement as per CD 564 – Departmental Security
    2. implementing a process and designating staff to record all required CSC volunteer information in CSC’s volunteer resource management database
    3. appointing volunteers to be National Volunteer Committee board members
    4. submitting a report on regional CSC volunteer activities to the Assistant Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, annually
    5. responding to volunteers’ appeals in cases of suspension or termination
    6. ensuring that processes are in place to promote and recognize the value of volunteers and the importance of receiving support from management and staff
    7. ensuring volunteers provide services in an environment that is free of discrimination and harassment as defined in the Canadian Human Rights Act and in the spirit of the Treasury Board Policy on Harassment Prevention and Resolution.
  3. The operational unit head (Institutional Head/District Director) will:
    1. risk-assess and approve, as appropriate, all volunteer activities recommended by the existing site review board as per CD 564 – Departmental Security
    2. ensure that:
      1. a volunteer recruitment and retention strategy is in place
      2. a Volunteer Application and Information form (CSC/SCC 0740) has been completed for prospective CSC volunteers prior to commencement of their activities
      3. when warranted, a reliability status has been granted and verified with the Departmental Security Division prior to the commencement of volunteer activities
      4. CSC’s national volunteer orientation is provided to all prospective CSC volunteers, and where required, CSC-approved training, prior to commencement of their volunteer activities
      5. all CSC volunteers are registered in the volunteer resource management database prior to commencement of their volunteer activities and that the information is accurate and up to date
      6. CSC identification cards are issued to CSC volunteers prior to commencement of their volunteer activities
      7. CSC volunteers’ responsibilities are clearly defined and reviewed with them annually
      8. a process is in place to record volunteer activities
      9. a safe and healthy workplace is provided to volunteers
      10. volunteers provide services in an environment that is free of discrimination and harassment as defined in the Canadian Human Rights Act and in the spirit of the Treasury Board Policy on Harassment Prevention and Resolution
      11. processes are implemented to promote and recognize the value of volunteers and the importance of receiving support from management and staff
    3. implement a process to recover CSC identification cards and any other CSC property from volunteers who have ceased their volunteer activities
    4. ensure that a copy of a valid driver’s licence and if needed, a copy of driving record is obtained and provided before authorizing CSC volunteers to use motor vehicles and other mobile equipment to pursue their assigned volunteer activities in accordance with Internal Services Directive (ISD) 335 – Fleet Management
    5. ensure that the institutional Volunteer Coordinators and/or Social Program Officers and community Volunteer Coordinators receive training on CSC’s volunteer resource management software
    6. review volunteer activities in the institution/community and assess their contributions to CSC semi-annually
    7. ensure that an annual report on volunteer activities is prepared and submitted to the Regional Deputy Commissioner
    8. appoint staff to the volunteer review committee to make recommendations whenever suspension or termination of an active volunteer is considered
    9. make a decision based on the volunteer review committee’s recommendation to suspend or terminate the status of an active volunteer
    10. notify the Regional Deputy Commissioner, the Departmental Security Division, and the Project Officer, Citizen Engagement and Ethnocultural Services, when a volunteer has been suspended or terminated
    11. notify the Aboriginal Liaison Officer or the Aboriginal Community Liaison Officer when a volunteer working with offenders following a traditional path has been suspended or terminated.
  4. The Project Officer, Citizen Engagement and Ethnocultural Services, will:
    1. advise and support the institutional Volunteer Coordinators and/or Social Program Officers and community Volunteer Coordinators regarding the roles and responsibilities relating to the management of volunteers
    2. ensure that volunteer contributions and concerns are brought to the attention of the Citizen Engagement Division at National Headquarters
    3. monitor CSC’s volunteer resource management database to identify errors or irregularities and bring them to the attention of the institutional Volunteer Coordinator and/or Social Program Officer, community Volunteer Coordinator or other appropriate CSC staff members
    4. engage with the National Volunteer Committee board members to support and promote regional volunteer activities at the national level
    5. coordinate the reporting of all volunteer activities at the operational sites for the region
    6. notify other operational units, as required, when a volunteer is under review or has been suspended or terminated.
  5. The institutional Volunteer Coordinator and/or Social Program Officer (or designate by the operational unit head), or the community Volunteer Coordinator, will:
    1. facilitate and coordinate volunteer activities at the operational site
    2. liaise with the Aboriginal Liaison Officer or the Aboriginal Community Liaison Officer when a volunteer delivers aboriginal cultural/ceremonial services
    3. facilitate and coordinate the volunteer application and security screening process
    4. ensure each applicant’s information is entered into CSC’s volunteer resource management database
    5. ensure that, prior to commencement of their activities, all volunteers working with offenders have completed CSC’s national volunteer orientation and, as required, received additional training
    6. ensure that, if warranted, prior to commencement of their activities, all volunteers working with offenders have a valid reliability status corresponding to their volunteer activities
    7. ensure that all volunteer information in CSC’s volunteer resource management database is accurate and up to date, including status (e.g., active, inactive, withdrawn, suspended, terminated or rejected)
    8. maintain each volunteer’s file in accordance with the Treasury Board Policy on Information Management
    9. act as a liaison between volunteers and offenders and, as required, with community Parole Officers to provide support and guidance relating to volunteer roles and responsibilities
    10. provide the Principal Entrance Officer at the institution with a list of all authorized volunteers
    11. document in the volunteer’s file any reviews or decisions regarding suspension or termination
    12. prepare an annual report on volunteer activities.

Suspension or Termination of Volunteer Status

  1. Whenever suspension or termination of an active CSC volunteer is considered, a review must be conducted by a committee appointed by the operational unit head.
  2. The volunteer review committee will complete the review within 30 calendar days and present its findings to the operational unit head for a decision.
  3. Cases must be documented in the volunteer’s file and communicated to the Project Officer, Citizen Engagement and Ethnocultural Services.
  4. When a CSC volunteer is under review for termination or suspension, he/she is not permitted to conduct volunteer activities at the current site.
  5. If the individual is a volunteer at multiple operational sites, the Project Officer, Citizen Engagement and Ethnocultural Services, must notify affected sites that a review is occurring.
  6. Suspension or termination decisions rest with the operational unit head and must be communicated in writing to the volunteer within seven days.
  7. The operational unit head, or delegate, will notify the Regional Deputy Commissioner, the Departmental Security Division, and the Project Officer, Citizen Engagement and Ethnocultural Services, when a volunteer has been suspended or terminated.
  8. A volunteer may appeal the decision to the Regional Deputy Commissioner in writing within 60 days.
  9. Following a decision to terminate the volunteer status, should the former volunteer reapply, a reassessment of the risk will be conducted:
    1. no earlier than six months after the decision, or
    2. as soon as possible, when new information is obtained that could have altered the original decision.
  10. CSC, at its sole discretion, may suspend or terminate the status of a volunteer.

Identification Cards

  1. Identification cards will be issued to all CSC volunteers.

Security

  1. Applicants requiring reliability status will complete the Personnel Screening, Consent and Authorization Form (TBS/SCT 330-23), which will be processed by the Departmental Security Division in accordance with CD 564-1 – Individual Security Screening.
  2. The reimbursement of volunteer fingerprinting costs will be provided by the regions.

Non-Security Escort Volunteers

  1. Pursuant to CD 566-5 – Non-Security Escorts, volunteers will:
    1. have completed CSC’s national volunteer orientation prior to training for non-security escorts
    2. provide a copy of a valid driver’s licence and, if requested, a copy of driving record annually, pursuant to ISD 335 – Fleet Management
    3. have a valid reliability status.

Insurance and Indemnification

  1. CSC will ensure that CSC volunteers are covered, either through the self-insurance of the Crown or an appropriate insurance policy, for accidental death, dismemberment and general liability as per TBS Guideline. This coverage will only extend to volunteers engaged in CSC-approved activities that have been risk-assessed and approved by operational unit heads prior to taking place.

Commissioner,

Original Signed by:
Don Head

ANNEX A

CROSS-REFERENCES AND DEFINITIONS

CROSS-REFERENCES

CD 001 – Mission, Values and Ethics Framework of the Correctional Service of Canada
CD 023 – Citizen Advisory Committees
CD 060 – Code of Discipline
SOP 087 – Official Languages
CD 253 – Employee Assistance Program
CD 254 – Occupational Safety and Health and Return to Work Programs
CD 265 – CSC Recognition Program
ISD 335 – Fleet Management
CD 559 – Visits
CD 564 – Departmental Security
CD 564-1 – Individual Security Screening
CD 564-2 – Departmental Physical Security
CD 566 – Framework for the Prevention of Security Incidents
CD 566-1 – Control of Entry to and Exit from Institutions
CD 566-2 – Control of Vehicle Entry to and Exit from Institutions
CD 566-5 – Non-Security Escorts
CD 566-8 – Searching of Staff and Visitors
GL 566-8-1 – Use of Non-Intrusive Search Tools
GL 566-8-2 – Technical Requirements for Ion Mobility Spectrometry Devices
CD 577 – Staff Protocol in Women Offender Institutions
CD 701 – Information Sharing
CD 702 – Aboriginal Offenders
CD 715 – Community Supervision Framework
CD 715-1 – Community Supervision
CD 750 – Chaplaincy Services
CD 767 – Ethnocultural Offenders: Services and Interventions

Management of Volunteers – Manual for Staff

Canadian Human Rights Act
Reference Handbook – Volunteering in the Correctional Service of Canada
Security Bulletin 2010-02 – Information Security and Safeguarding Bulletin
Security Bulletin 2013-03 – Information and Security Safeguarding
Treasury Board Guideline for Employees of the Government of Canada: Information Management (IM) Basics
Treasury Board Guideline on Self-Insurance
Treasury Board Policy on Government Security
Treasury Board Policy on Harassment Prevention and Resolution
Treasury Board Policy on Information Management
Treasury Board Policy on Privacy Protection
Treasury Board Standard on Security Screening
Treasury Board Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector

DEFINITIONS

Citizen Advisory Committee(CAC): consists of members of the community in which the penitentiary or parole office is situated. Members promote and facilitate the involvement of citizens in the operation of the Service.

Community Volunteer Coordinator: the individual identified in the community who manages the volunteer program, including the administration, training and evaluation of volunteers.

National Volunteer Committee: a committee made up of CSC volunteers and staff that represent both institutions and the community. This committee works with National Headquarters and provides direction for the CSC volunteer program.

National volunteer orientation: a mandatory orientation for CSC volunteers, which must be completed prior to participation in volunteer activities. The orientation includes an overview of the fundamental principles of volunteering with offenders in a correctional institution or community setting.

Operational unit: an institution or a district (this includes parole offices and Community Correctional Centres).

Operational unit head: the person or delegate responsible for the institution or district.

Social Program Officer: the position in the institution that facilitates and coordinates the volunteer program, including the orientation, training and evaluation of volunteers.

Volunteer review committee: an ad hoc committee appointed by the operational unit head or delegate to investigate volunteer performance concerns. This committee made up of three individuals, one of whom is a volunteer representative such as a Citizen Advisory Committee or National Volunteer Committee member, presents its findings to the operational unit head or delegate for a decision.

ANNEX B

AGE OF MAJORITY

Province Age of majority Reference
Nova Scotia 19 Age of Majority Act, R.S.N.S., c. 4, s. 2(1)
New Brunswick 19 Age of Majority Act, R.S.N.B. 2011, c. 103, s. 1(1)
Prince Edward Island 18 Age of Majority Act, R.S.P.E.I., 1988, c. A-8, s. 1
Newfoundland and Labrador 19 Age of Majority Act, S.N.L. 1995, c. A-4.2, s. 2
Québec 18 Code civil, art. 153
Ontario 18 Age of Majority and Accountability Act, R.S.O., 1990, c. A7, s. 1
Nunavut 19 Age of Majority Act, R.S.N.W.T. (Nu) 1988, c. A-2
Manitoba 18 Age of Majority Act, R.S.M., c. A7, s. 1
Saskatchewan 18 Age of Majority Act, R.S.S. 1978, c. A-6, s. 2(1)
Northwest Territories 19 Age of Majority Act, R.S.N.W.T. 1988, c. A-2
Alberta 18 Age of Majority Act, R.S.A. 2000, c. A-6, s. 1
Yukon 19 Age of Majority Act, R.S.Y. 2002, c. 2, s. 1 (1)
British Columbia 19 Age of Majority Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 7, s. 1

For more information

To learn about upcoming or ongoing consultations on proposed federal regulations, visit the Canada Gazette and Consulting with Canadians websites.