Supporting Information on Lower-Level Programs

Supplementary Information

Supporting Information on Lower-Level Programs

Supporting information on lower-level programs is available on the CSC's website.

Program 1.0: Custody

Description

The Custody Program contributes to public safety by providing for the day-to-day needs of offenders, including health and safety, food, clothing, mental health services and physical health care. It also includes security measures within institutions such as drug interdiction and appropriate control practices to prevent incidents.

Under the Custody Program there are four sub-programs and six sub-sub-programs; all contribute to the safe, secure and humane custody of offenders in institutions. Below is information on the lower-level programs for the Custody Program.

Sub-Program 1.1: Institutional Management and Support

Description

The Institutional Management and Support Program contributes to public safety through the day-to-day management of operational activities and institutional services for offenders in custody.

Key activities include administering, operating and maintaining institutions; establishing operational processes and procedures; managing allocated financial and human resources; directing and overseeing the delivery of integrated correctional operations; monitoring the effectiveness of institutional security activities; considering threats, risks, vulnerabilities and physical security requirements and controls; managing the intelligence function for institutions; ensuring coordination across the criminal justice system; providing a safe environment for staff and inmates; and making decisions and recommendations related to offenders within delegated authorities.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators TargetFootnote 1 Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual             results 2015–16 Actual results
Institutional management is compliant with policy and law Rate of critical safety incidentsFootnote 2 in federal institutions (suicides, accidental deaths) (Objective: ZeroFootnote 3) 0.60 – 0.72 2018-03-31 .65 1.01 .68
Rate of serious safety incidentsFootnote 4 in federal institutions 7.32 – 9.42 2018-03-31 10.46 9.98 8.62
Rate of minor/moderate safety incidentsFootnote 5 in federal institutions 115.1 – 163.4 2018-03-31 192.3 185.5 177.0
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
113,524,097 112,988,166 112,988,166
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
935 935 935

Sub-Program 1.2: Institutional Security

Description

The Institutional Security Program contributes to public safety through the development, implementation of, and compliance with, policies and procedures designed to ensure the safety and security of staff, offenders and the public, while meeting the security requirements of the diverse inmate population.

Key activities include dynamic security, security intelligence, segregation, perimeter control, and the prevention and control of contraband and drugs.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Institutions are safe and secure Rate of critical security incidentsFootnote 6 in federal institutions (security-related and undetermined offender deaths in custody) - (Objective: Zero) 0.31 – 0.46 2018-03-31 .20 .07 .55
Rate of serious security incidentsFootnote 7 in federal institutions 5.75 – 7.16 2018-03-31 5.75 6.95 8.08
Rate of minor/moderate security incidentsFootnote 8 in federal institutions 145.4 – 156.9 2018-03-31 169.4 168.0 169.1
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
742,425,535 741,878,982 741,878,982
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
6,908 6,908 6,908

Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.1: Intelligence and Supervision

Description

The Intelligence and Supervision Program contributes to public safety through the provision of security and the gathering, analysis, and sharing of intelligence. This is done by identifying and managing illegal activities and threats to security for offenders in institutions and in the community in conjunction and cooperation with external partner agencies.

Key activities include gathering and sharing information and intelligence to prevent security incidents, eradicating illegal activity and supporting the case management process; continually assessing threats and risks to identify and mitigate internal and external threats to the safety of individuals and institutions; collaborating, liaising and sharing information with justice partners both domestically and internationally; identifying and managing security threat groups; and preventing, intercepting, and eliminating illegal or threatening activities.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Activities that threaten the safety and security of institutions are managed Rate of transitions to higher security 86.2 – 91.6 2018-03-31 90.0 86.8 83.1
Rate of serious security chargesFootnote 9 517.0 – 551.6 2018-03-31 562.1 475.1 424.0
Median days in administrative segregationFootnote 10 14.7 days (MarkerFootnote 11) 2018-03-31 15 14 12
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
730,830,705 730,460,584 730,460,584
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
6,816 6,816 6,816

Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.2: Drug Interdiction

Description

The Drug Interdiction Program contributes to public safety through the development, implementation, and coordination of activities included in Correctional Service of Canada's national drug strategy. This is done to ensure a safe, drug-free institutional environment for inmates, which is a fundamental condition for their successful reintegration into society as law-abiding citizens.

Key activities include assessing risk related to drug use and trafficking, detecting and deterring drug use and/or trafficking of drugs, using security services such as urinalysis, drug detector dogs, ion mobility spectrometry, and other services or devices, and reviewing the imposition of administrative measures.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Drug interdiction activities contribute to successful completion of offenders' correctional plans Rate of critical drug-related incidentsFootnote 12 in federal institutions (overdose and suspected overdose offender deaths in custody) - (Objective: Zero)     0.22 – 0.28 2018-03-31 .13 .40 .34
Rate of serious drug-related incidentsFootnote 13 - (Objective: Zero) 3.18 – 3.52 2018-03-31 2.68 4.59 3.15
Rate of minor/moderate drug-related incidentsFootnote 14 - (Objective: Zero) 195.9 – 212.3 2018-03-31 180.0 184.0 190.5
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
11,594,830 11,418,398 11,418,398
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
92 92 92

Sub-Program 1.3: Institutional Health Services

Description

The Institutional Health Services Program contributes to public safety by providing essential health care and reasonable access to non-essential mental health care to inmates, in accordance with professionally accepted standards, to promote, improve and maintain offender health in institutions. These health services are delivered across the continuum of care, from intake to release, while considering the needs of vulnerable populations.

Key activities include disease prevention, health education as well as screening, diagnosis, treatment, release planning and the administration, development and implementation of policy and programs to maintain and improve program delivery.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
The provision of efficient, effective health services to offenders that encourage individual responsibility, promote healthy reintegration and contribute to safe communities Maintain Health Services Accreditation Accreditation 2018-03-31 Accreditation Accreditation Accreditation
Percentage of newly admitted offenders receiving health assessments at intake 90% - 100% 2018-03-31 98.4% 98.0% 98.5%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
221,372,132 215,441,160 215,441,160
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
1,339 1,339 1,339

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.1: Clinical and Public Health Services

Description

The Clinical and Public Health Services Program contributes to public safety by providing essential health care to inmates, to promote, improve and maintain inmates' health within institutions, in accordance with professionally accepted standards. These services are delivered across the continuum of care from intake to release, while considering the needs of vulnerable populations.

Key activities across the continuum of care include disease prevention and control, health promotion, screening and assessment, primary health services, acute hospital care, referral to medical specialists, treatment, provision of medications, pharmacy services and release planning.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14   Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
The provision of efficient, effective clinical and public health services to offenders that encourage individual responsibility, promote healthy reintegration and contribute to safe communities Percentage of inmates with an HIV infection that are on treatment 80% - 85% 2018-03-31 85.5% 90.5% 91.5%
Proportion of inmates who completed HCV treatment that achieved sustained viral response 80% - 85% 2018-03-31 N/A N/A 97.3%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
141,618,577 136,240,501 136,240,501
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
718 718 718

Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.2: Mental Health Services

Description

The Mental Health Services Program contributes to public safety by providing inmates with essential mental health care and reasonable access to non-essential mental health care to promote, improve and maintain offender health in accordance with professionally accepted standards. These services are delivered across the continuum of care from intake to release, while considering the needs of vulnerable populations. The continuum of care is reflected through CSC's comprehensive Mental Health Strategy developed to enhance its capacity to address and respond to the mental health needs of offenders.

Key activities include mental health screening at intake, primary and intermediate mental health care in institutions, intensive care at Regional Treatment Centres, release preparation and transitional care for release to the community.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
The provision of efficient, effective mental health services to offenders that encourage individual responsibility, promote healthy reintegration and contribute to safe communities Percentage of target staffFootnote 15 trained in the Fundamentals of Mental Health 90% (Marker) 2018-03-31 93.9% 94.2% 96.0%
Percentage of target staff trained in the Suicide & Self-Injury Intervention Refresher 90% (Marker) 2018-03-31 91.3% 79.3% (in-class) 82.5% (online) 75.0% (in-class) 80.2% (online)
Percentage of target staff trained in Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) Introduction and Coaching. 90% (Marker) 2018-03-31 88.5% 77.6% 86.0%
Of the inmates identified by the mental health intake screening system as requiring follow-up mental health services, the percentage who received a service 90% (Marker) 2018-03-31 98.0% 95.1% 89.0%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
79,753,555 79,200,659 79,200,659
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
621 621 621

Sub-Program 1.4: Institutional Services

Description

The Institutional Services Program contributes to public safety through the daily operations of institutions. This program aims to provide safe, secure and humane living conditions for inmates.

Key activities include accommodation support, engineering services, provision of food services and clothing, institutional maintenance, fleet management, telecommunications, environmental protection and sustainable development, fire safety protection, and maintenance of security electronics.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Inmates are provided safe, secure and humane living conditions Percentage of upheld grievancesFootnote 16 related to living conditions 3.8% - 5.5% 2018-03-31 3.2% 2.6% 3.2%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
450,845,080 442,708,286 442,573,286
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
1,384 1,384 1,384

Sub-Sub-Program 1.4.1: Food Services

Description

The Food Services Program contributes to public safety by providing nutritionally balanced meals to offenders in institutions. Meal preparation is based on appropriate nutrition standards for Canadians such as Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide. The program meets the needs of offenders requiring specific diets for their faith or for therapeutic reasons.

Key activities include setting the overall policy direction for the delivery of food services; monitoring food services activities to ensure adherence to standards; ensuring all activities related to the ordering, storage, preparation and service of food and disposal of waste meet food safety standards; and planning for food service within the established budget.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Inmates' dietary needs are met in accordance with the Canada Food Guide Percentage of positive health inspections by external health inspectors 91% 2018-03-31 91% 71% 77%
Percentage of menus meeting Canada's Food Guide and Dietary Reference Intakes 90% 2018-03-31 71% 89% 100%
Percentage of upheld grievancesFootnote 17 related to food services 3.7% - 6.2% 2018-03-31 2.9% 2.2% 1.9%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
65,808,173 66,098,856 65,963,856
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
414 414 414

Sub-Sub-Program 1.4.2: Accommodation Services

Description

The Accommodation Services Program contributes to public safety through maintenance and repair of institutional vehicles, buildings/structures, and lands as well as related basic services for offenders. This is done so that institutions can meet their operational requirements including the provision of safe and clean living and working conditions for staff and for offenders in custody.

Key activities include the provision of basic necessities to offenders, technical support, housekeeping, laundry services, engineering services, environmental services, waste management, electrical, water and sewage, heating/co-generation of power, plumbing, fire protection, motor vehicle maintenance and operations, carpentry, masonry, painting, welding and millwright, general labour, general maintenance, and landscaping.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Inmates are provided safe and clean living and working environments Percentage of upheld grievances related to accommodation servicesFootnote 18 3.8% - 5.4% 2018-03-31 3.4% 2.9% 4.3%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
385,036,907 376,609,430 376,609,430
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
970 970 970

Program 2.0: Correctional Interventions

Description

The Correctional Interventions Program contributes to public safety through assessment activities and program interventions for federal offenders that are designed to assist their rehabilitation and facilitate their successful reintegration into the community as law-abiding citizens. The program engages Canadian citizens as partners in CSC's correctional mandate, and provides outreach to victims of crime.

Under the Correctional Interventions Program there are six sub-programs and seven sub-sub-programs which all contribute to the safe transitions of offenders back to the community by identifying and addressing the risks and needs of offenders with targeted correctional interventions.

Sub-Program 2.1: Offender Case Management

Description

The Offender Case Management Program contributes to public safety through a dynamic process that includes interventions to assess, clarify, counsel, plan programs for, and supervise offenders throughout their sentences.

Key activities include sentence management, intake assessment, penitentiary placement, offender personal development, transfers, the development and management of correctional plans, and institutional and community supervision.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
The accurate assessment of risk and supervision of offenders contributes to a reduction in crime Percentage of Day Parole cases reviewed by Parole Board Canada, based on the total number of cases eligible for a review 59.7% - 66.0% 2018-03-31 57.8% 61.2% 64.6%
Percentage of successful transitions to lower securityFootnote 19 93.8% - 94.4% 2018-03-31 94.5% 94.3% 94.9%
The percentage of Aboriginal offenders with Corrections and Conditional Release Act (CCRA) Section 84 release plan 35% 2018-03-31 N/A N/A N/A
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
219,648,375 220,816,037 220,816,037
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
2,280 2,280 2,280

Sub-Program 2.2: Community Engagement

Description

The Community Engagement Program contributes to public safety by increasing citizens' understanding of the federal correctional process and enhancing CSC's partnerships with Canadian communities.

Key activities include raising public awareness and improving confidence in federal corrections; providing victims with information; negotiating partnership agreements with various stakeholders; and creating collaborative working relationships with diverse segments of the community including citizens, non-governmental agencies, other government departments, and offenders who have successfully reintegrated into the community.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
The involvement of the public contributes to the offender reintegration process Number of hours provided by volunteers 390,000 2018-03-31 N/A N/A N/A
Number of registered victims 7,500 (Marker) 2018-03-31 N/A N/A N/A
Number of referrals and active cases for victim-offender mediation services  through CSC's Restorative Opportunities Program 110 referrals/ 300 Active Cases 2018-03-31 N/A N/A N/A
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
8,665,197 8,981,296 8,981,296
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
83 83 83

Sub-Program 2.3: Spiritual Services

Description

The Spiritual Services Program contributes to public safety by providing spiritual intervention and guidance to offenders, and by developing and maintaining faith-community reintegration partnerships. It also includes providing culturally relevant assistance to First Nations, Métis and Inuit offenders regarding ceremonies, traditional teachings, traditional medicines or sacred grounds within institutions or in the community through the services of Aboriginal Elders. The program increases the likelihood of success for a safe and wholesome release of offenders back into the community.

Key activities include directing and coordinating religious services and sacramental ministry; spiritual and cultural teachings for First Nations, Métis and Inuit offenders; creating, coordinating, and delivering religious activities; interpreting the needs and concerns of persons affected by the criminal justice system to the community; educating the community concerning its role in reconciliation, and establishing and maintaining partnerships to help offenders live in the community as law-abiding citizens.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual          results
Offenders have access to spiritual services Percentage compliance with established standards for institutional and community-based spiritual services 100% 2018-03-31 Within range 1717.5 hours of institutional service delivery per 187 incarcerated offenders 100% 86%
Aboriginal Offenders have access to spiritual and cultural services Yes 2018-03-31 100% 100% 100%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
16,893,618 15,614,369 15,614,369
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
20 20 20

Sub-Program 2.3.1: Chaplaincy

Description

The Chaplaincy Program contributes to public safety by providing opportunities for offenders to examine their behaviours and decisions and discover new ways of living in the context of their faith practice. This can help offenders find greater wholeness and accept responsibility for their actions, which in turn contributes to their safe reintegration into Canadian communities.

The right of offenders to practice their religion is guaranteed by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and other legislation. Chaplaincy ensures that offenders of all traditions are offered opportunities to practice their faith.

Key activities include the development, implementation, delivery, and management of religious and spiritual activities, which includes volunteer and other community resources.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Offenders have access to Chaplaincy services Number of institutional Chaplaincy contacts with offenders 332,500-367,500 2018-03-31 373,969 contacts with incarcerated offenders 398, 212 407,639
Number of institutional Chaplaincy activities in which volunteers are engaged 9,500-10,500 2018-03-31 28,655 32,370 activities N/A
Number of hours of service in which Faith Community Reintegration Projects volunteers are engaged 16,150-17,850 2018-03-31 23,930 32,000 hrs N/A
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
8,991,033 8,354,233 8,354,233
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
17 17 17

Sub-Program 2.3.2: Elder Services

Description

The Elder Services Program contributes to public safety through the counselling, teachings and ceremonial services provided to First Nations, Métis and Inuit men and women offenders who are following a traditional healing path. Elder services also include the provision of spiritual support and advice to the institutional head regarding ceremonies and offenders' access to ceremonial objects and traditional medicines within the institution.

Key activities include counseling; providing spiritual and cultural teachings to First Nations, Métis and Inuit offenders; delivering ceremonial services; and establishing and maintaining partnerships to help offenders reintegrate and live in the community as law-abiding citizens.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Aboriginal offenders have access to spiritual and cultural services The percentage of Aboriginal offenders who identify an interest in following a traditional healing path and receive Elder Reviews 70.0% - 80.0% 2018-03-31 71% 92% 92%
The percentage of Aboriginal offenders who identify an interest in following a traditional healing path and working with Elders in spiritual/cultural interventions such as Pathways, cultural escorted temporary absences 70.0% - 80.0% 2018-03-31 50% 62% 60%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
7,902,585 7,260,136 7,260,136
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
3 3 3

Sub-Program 2.4: Correctional Reintegration Program

Description

The Correctional Reintegration Program contributes to public safety by providing programs and implementing policies that are specifically designed to support offender rehabilitation and reintegration, and that involve structured interventions grounded in evidence-based, social and psychological research. Operating from a cognitive-behavioural approach, correctional programs are designed to address risk factors that contribute to reoffending.

Key activities include the development, implementation, delivery and effective management of nationally recognized correctional programs.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Participation in Correctional Reintegration Programs contributes to the offender reintegration process Completion rate of nationally recognized correctional programs in the institutionsFootnote 20 82.0% - 84.0% 2018-03-31 83.9% 85.1% 85.5%
Completion rate of nationally recognized correctional programs in the communityFootnote 21 63.4% - 65.2% 2018-03-31 67.3% 65.5% 66.2%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
83,111,121 84,315,878 84,315,878
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
808 808 808

Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.1: Correctional Program Readiness

Description

The Correctional Program Readiness Program includes nationally recognized programs that prepare and motivate offenders to address risk factors related to offending.

Key activities include identifying problematic behavior, providing motivational support to offenders, and preparing offenders to address their risk factors.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Participation in correctional program readiness programs contributes to the offender reintegration process by preparing and motivating offenders to address risk factors related to their offending Median time from admission to the start of readiness programsFootnote 22 36.4 – 44.0 2018-03-31 48 43 47
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
8,977,336 8,951,334 8,951,334
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
89 89 89

Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.2: Correctional Programs

Description

Correctional Programs include nationally recognized correctional programs to specifically address risk factors related to offending at intensity levels commensurate to offenders' risk and needs.

Key activities include teaching offenders skills that will help reduce their problematic behaviour and assisting offenders to change pro-criminal attitudes and beliefs, manage themselves, set goals, solve problems, and develop healthy interpersonal relationships and coping skills.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Participation in correctional programming contributes to the reduced re-offending and facilitate the safe and timely reintegration of offenders into the community Of the offenders serving a sentence of four years or less, with an identified need for correctional programming, the percentage who enrol in such programming prior to full parole eligibility date 73.5% - 78.5% 2018-03-31 81.5% 80.8% 70.2%
Of the offenders serving a sentence of four years or less, with an identified need for correctional programming, the percentage who complete such programming prior to full parole eligibility date 54.5% - 58.7% 2018-03-31 59.0% 57.3% 46.8%
Of the offenders serving a sentence of four years or less, with an identified need for correctional programming, the percentage who complete such programming prior to warrant expiry date 88.4% - 90.8% 2018-03-31 89.7% 90.8% 90.1%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
61,229,616 62,519,318 62,519,318
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
596 596 596

Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.3: Correctional Program Maintenance

Description

The Correctional Program Maintenance Program includes nationally recognized correctional programs designed to support offenders to continue to make changes and maintain skills learned through their participation in correctional programming. These programs are delivered to offenders in the institution and in the community.

Key activities include providing support to offenders to maintain and apply the skills that they learned in other correctional programs in order to monitor and cope with daily challenges.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Participation in correctional programming maintenance contributes to the offender reintegration process by supporting offenders to apply the skills acquired through correctional programming Completion rates of maintenance programs in the institutionFootnote 23 79.0% - 81.1% 2018-03-31 79.5% 82.4% 83.4%
Completion rates of maintenance programs in the communityFootnote 24 65.2% - 67.7% 2018-03-31 70.0% 68.4% 68.5%
Of the offenders with an identified need for correctional maintenance programming, the percentage who complete such programming prior to warrant expiry dateFootnote 25 75.1% - 80.1% 2018-03-31 80.5% 81.1% 82.0%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
12,904,169 12,845,226 12,845,226
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
123 123 123

Sub-Program 2.5: Offender Education

Description

The Offender Education Program contributes to public safety by providing offenders with basic literacy, academic, and personal development skills thereby improving their capacity to effectively participate in correctional programs. It also offers them an opportunity to improve their education qualifications, increasing their likelihood of successfully reintegrating into the community.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Education programs contribute to the rehabilitation and reintegration of offenders Of the offenders with an identified need for an upgrade to their education, the percentage who upgrade prior to full parole eligibility date 45.4% - 54.4% 2018-03-31 54.0% 55.4% 55.1%
Of offenders with an identified need for an upgrade to their education, the percentage  who upgrade prior to warrant expiry date 51.6% - 63.2% 2018-03-31 57.6% 63.1% 65.2%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
22,688,473 22,174,879 22,174,879
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
167 167 167

Sub-Program 2.6: CORCAN Employment and Employability

Description

The CORCAN Employment and Employability Program contributes to public safety by helping offenders develop and enhance their employment skills to meet the specific demands of the labour market, thereby improving their chances of employment and safe release into the community.

Key activities include employment training and career planning programs for inmates as well as employment and job placement services for offenders after release. It is designed to allow offenders to acquire skills and develop the pro-social attitudes and behaviours that are valued by employers. This is a key part of CSC's efforts to actively support offenders to become law-abiding citizens.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Offenders have the employment skills to meet labour markets and obtain employment upon release from institutions Of the offenders with an identified need for vocational training, the percentage who complete prior to first release 54.2% - 60.5% 2018-03-31 57.7% 60.5% 60.3%
Of the offenders with an identified need for employment in the community, the percentage who secure such employment prior to warrant expiry dateFootnote 26 73.2% - 74.1% 2018-03-31 71.9% 74.5% 75.0%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
35,294,164 35,197,881 35,197,881
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
488 488 488

Sub-Program 2.7: Social Programs

Description

The Social Program contributes to public safety by providing a combination of structured and unstructured interventions and activities designed to prepare offenders for reintegration into the community as law-abiding citizens.

The program encourages offenders to adopt pro-social lifestyles and contributes to a meaningful use of time by providing basic life skills. It provides offenders with opportunities to learn and practice social skills necessary for personal and social development, and increases offenders' awareness of their strengths and weaknesses, which assists them to overcome possible roadblocks to reintegration.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Social programs provide offenders with knowledge and skills that better equip them for their re-entry into society and support changes that lead to a balanced and healthy prosocial lifestyle Of the offenders enrolled in the Community Integration Program, the percentage who complete 80.2%-83.6% 2018-03-31 77.0% 81.2% 85.2%
Of the offenders enrolled in the Social Integration Program for Women, the percentage who complete 85.6%-86.9% 2018-03-31 89.6% 84.7% 90.8%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
21,056,596 20,835,653 20,835,653
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
214 214 214

Program 3.0: Community Supervision

Description

The Community Supervision Program contributes to public safety through the administration of community operations, including the provision of accommodation options, establishment of community partnerships and provision of community health services as necessary. Community supervision provides the structure to assist offenders to safely and successfully reintegrate into society.

Under the Community Supervision Program, there are three sub-programs and two sub-sub-programs that contribute to the reintegration of offenders into the community as law-abiding citizens while under supervision.

Sub-Program 3.1: Community Management and Security

Description

The Community Management and Security Program contributes to public safety by supervising and managing offenders in the community, and by gathering, analyzing, and sharing intelligence.

Key activities include supervising offenders, updating correctional plans, the Community Staff Safety Program, Electronic Monitoring, the National Centralized after-hours Duty Office, the After Hours Victim Notification Program and the Correctional Service of Canada Tip Line Program.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Community management is compliant with policy and law Rate of critical convictions under supervisionFootnote 27 (Objective: Zero) 0.55 – 0.78 2018-03-31 .64 .37 .48
Rate of serious convictions under supervisionFootnote 28 28.0 – 43.6 2018-03-31 35.4 28.4 28.5
Rate of minor/moderate convictions under supervisionFootnote 29 183.1 – 221.5 2018-03-31 222.5 183.4 178.5
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
20,938,275 21,829,521 21,829,521
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
108 108 108

Sub-Program 3.2: Community-based Residential Facilities

Description

The Community-based Residential Facilities Program contributes to public safety by providing a structured and supportive environment during the gradual reintegration process. The program provides accommodation for offenders on parole, statutory release, temporary absence and Long Term Supervision Orders.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators TargetFootnote 30 Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Community-based Residential Facilities provide supervised and supportive accommodation that supports safe reintegration Percentage of successful residency supervision periods (no revocations, sensational incidents, charges or convictions) - Community-based Residential Facilities 69.7% - 71.6% 2018-03-31 72.8% 73.0% 72.0%
Rate of Community-based Residential Facility incidentsFootnote 31 363.0 (Marker) 2018-03-31 351.5 363.0 389.2
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
122,797,753 113,912,450 113,912,450
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
2 2 2

Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.1: Community Residential Facilities

Description

The Community Residential Facilities Program contributes to public safety by providing accommodation for offenders in what are commonly known as "halfway houses" as well as Hostels, Private Home Placements and Treatment Centres. Community Residential Facilities are operated by non-profit community-based agencies under contract with CSC and promote the successful reintegration of offenders into the community.

Key activities include providing supervision, intervention, support, monitoring and accommodation for offenders on release.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Offenders with residency conditions have appropriate supervision and housing in the community Percentage of successful residency supervision periods (no revocations, charges or convictions) - Community Residential Facilities 75.3% - 76.4% 2018-03-31 76.9% 77.3% 75.9%
Rate of "fail to returnFootnote 32" among offenders residing in a Community Residential Facilities 250.3 – 316.4 2018-03-31 277.8 246.8 273.4
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
102,520,720 95,067,863 95,067,863
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
0 0 0

Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.2: Community Correctional Centres

Description

The Community Correctional Centres Program contributes to public safety by managing federally-operated community-based residential facilities that provide a 24-hour structured living environment for the purpose of safely reintegrating offenders into the community. Community Correctional Centres accommodate offenders under federal jurisdiction who have been released to the community on unescorted temporary absences, day parole, full parole, work releases, statutory release, as well as those subject to Long-Term Supervision Orders.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Higher risk offenders have appropriate levels of supervision and housing while on conditional release with a residency condition Percentage of successful residency supervision periods (no revocations, charges or convictions) - Community Correctional Centres 48.6% - 51.1% 2018-03-31 54.0% 52.5% 51.1%
Rate of "fail to return" among offenders residing in a Community Correctional Centre 569.3 – 773.3 2018-03-31 492.9 535.4 529.6
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
20,277,033 18,844,587 18,844,587
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
2 2 2

Sub-Program 3.3: Community Health Services

Description

The Community Health Services Program contributes to public safety by providing essential health services for offenders residing in a Community Correctional Centre, in accordance with professionally accepted standards. CSC pays, on a fee-for-service basis, the costs associated with essential health services for non-insured offenders in the community. In addition, as part of its Mental Health Strategy, CSC provides, at some community sites, mental health services to offenders with significant mental health challenges to contribute to their safe reintegration into the community.

Key activities include providing specialized mental health support and services to address mental health needs (e.g., crisis intervention and counselling), and links to community agencies.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
The provision of efficient, effective health services to offenders that encourage individual responsibility, promote healthy reintegration and contribute to safe communities Of the offenders identified as having a significant mental health need, the number and percentage  who received mental health intervention from CSC in the community 90% 2018-03-31 N/A N/A N/A
The percentage of offenders who had received mental health treatment from CSC returning to federal custody during the period of community supervision less than or equal to 50% 2018-03-31 N/A N/A 50.9%
The percentage of offenders who had received mental health treatment from CSC returning to federal custody within two years post warrant expiry less than or equal to 20% 2018-03-31 N/A N/A 8.1%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
14,094,327 13,818,893 13,818,893
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
108 108 108

Footnotes

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Targets are established through the statistical analysis of historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what is anticipated as a performance range (target) is objective and reflective of changes within the operational context.

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Footnote 2

Critical safety incidents include all deaths in custody where cause of death is suicide or accident

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Footnote 3

When dealing with deaths in custody, escapes, or drugs in institutions, CSC's objective is zero.  It is necessary, however, to put that objective in the context of reality, therefore, CSC's results will be compared to the anticipated range, as this range fully considers the reality of CSC's past and current operational context.

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Footnote 4

Serious safety incidents include the following incident types: attempted suicide; self-inflicted injuries; accident; damage to government property; fire; medical emergency; medical emergency – not attributable to assaultive behavior; damage to property of other person; hunger strike; or protective custody request.

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Footnote 5

Minor/moderate safety incidents are incidents of lesser impact where no person involved in the incident incurred an injury of major or serious bodily harm. It includes self-inflicted injuries; accident; damage to government property; fire; medical emergency; medical emergency – not attributable to assaultive behavior; damage to property of other person; hunger strike; or protective custody request.

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Footnote 6

Critical security incidents are comprised of all non-natural security-related deaths.  Critical security incidents include the following types of death: murder; use of force; awaiting coroner's report; and undetermined.

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Footnote 7

Serious security incidents include security incidents that are violent, major disturbances, and escapes.

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Footnote 8

Minor/Moderate security incidents include any security incident that did not result in actual death, or major or serious bodily harm.

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Footnote 9

Serious security charges (which include only those charges that resulted in a "guilty" finding) are laid when an offender commits, attempts or incites acts that are serious breaches of security, are violent, harmful to others, or repetitive violations of rules.

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Footnote 10

Median days in segregation" measures the median duration (in days) that offenders are held in administrative segregation within federal institutions.

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Footnote 11

Markers are used when there is not yet sufficient data to establish a benchmark.

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Footnote 12

Critical drug-related incidents are offender deaths in federal institutions due to overdose.

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Footnote 13

Serious drug-related incidents include any drug-related incident where at least one person involved in the incident incurred an injury of major or serious bodily harm.

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Footnote 14

Minor/moderate drug-related incidents include any drug-related incident where there was at least one identified instigator who committed the incident, or one identified victim and did not have any person involved in the incident who incurred an injury of major; serious bodily harm; or death (that did not result in actual death).

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Footnote 15

All staff (including casuals) having regular interaction with offenders, including those who supervise offenders in living areas, supervise the work or leisure activities of offenders, and those who provide case management, health care, programs, schooling, psychological services, or spiritual support to the offenders.

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Footnote 16

Total number of living condition grievances that were upheld (i.e. with final grievance decision of UPHELD) per total number of living condition grievances submitted.

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Footnote 17

Total number of food services grievances that were upheld (i.e. with final grievance decision of UPHELD) per total number of food services grievances submitted.

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Footnote 18

Total number of accommodation services grievances that were upheld (i.e. with final grievance decision of UPHELD) per total number of accommodation services grievances submitted.

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Footnote 19

Percentage of successful transitions to lower security represents the percentage of offenders who did not return to a higher security institutional placement (medium or maximum).

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Footnote 20

Includes all offenders regardless of sentence length; includes all nationally recognized correctional programs. The data is restricted to federal institutions, healing lodges, and provincial institutions.

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Footnote 21

Includes all offenders regardless of sentence length; includes all nationally recognized correctional programs.

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Footnote 22

Includes offenders serving sentences of 4 years or less; all readiness programs excluding the motivational modules and the community program. All women offenders are included. Male offenders are limited to those who are moderate or high risk (based on the CRS or SIR).

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Footnote 23

Includes all offenders regardless of sentence length; includes all nationally recognized correctional programs. The data is restricted to federal institutions, healing lodges, and provincial institutions.

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Footnote 24

Includes all offenders regardless of sentence length.

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Footnote 25

Includes all offenders regardless of sentence length.

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Footnote 26

Total number of offenders who obtained community employment prior to Warrant Expiry Date (WED) per the total number of offenders who reached WED with an identified employment need who were available for employment in the community.

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Footnote 27

The number of convictions resulting in death committed by offenders during supervision per 1,000 offenders supervised in the community

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Footnote 28

The number of serious convictions committed by offenders during supervision per 1,000 offenders supervised in the community.  Serious convictions on supervision include any offence listed on Schedule I of the Criminal Code of Canada Offence Schedule (serious or violent offences).

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Footnote 29

The number of minor/moderate convictions committed by offenders during supervision per 1,000 offenders supervised in the community.  Minor/moderate convictions on supervision include any offence listed on Schedule II of the Criminal Code of Canada Offence Schedule (drug-related offences) as well as any non-scheduled offences.

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Footnote 30

Targets are established through the statistical analysis of historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what is anticipated as a performance range (target) is objective and reflective of changes within the operational context.

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Footnote 31

The indicator represents the number of incidents that occurred in Community-Based Residential Facilities (Community Correctional Centres and Community Residential Facilities) per 1,000 offenders residing in such facilities.

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Footnote 32

The data represent the number of events per 1,000 offenders over a one year period, where a fail to return to a Community Residential Facilities is recorded. A fail to return to Community Residential Facility event occurs when an offender leaves the Community Residential Facility without authorization, does not return or is late returning to the Community Residential Facility where he/she is residing after having signed out.

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