Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management 2007-2010

This three-year plan outlines ways we will improve the management of our human resources and create an organization that is a workplace of choice within the Public Service.

Commissioner's Message

Human resource management is increasingly important in today's changing workforce. Some of the challenges CSC currently faces are common across the Public Service, while others are unique to CSC. Our challenges include changing demographics, projected labour shortages, effective labour relations and evolving learning needs. To ensure that CSC meets these challenges and to strengthen our human resource management, we have developed the three-year Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management.

This plan supports our efforts to strengthen management practices across CSC. It focuses on four priorities for the organization: strengthen our human resource management practices, build an effective representative workforce, provide learning, training and development, and improve workplace health and labour relations.

There is no question that this is an ambitious plan but each element is important to improve our organization and achieve our business priorities.

Every person at CSC has a role to play in helping to make this plan a reality. CSC's management team members recognize their shared accountability for this initiative and are committed to its success. Activities to support these priorities are underway and will continue over the next three years to ensure that our workplace is competitive in today's labour market.

I am confident that this plan positions us to make real improvements in our human resource management, while maintaining our public safety mandate.

Thank you for your cooperation as we move forward.

Keith Coulter

Commissioner, Correctional Service of Canada

Introduction

The Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management establishes priorities, plans and activities for the management of human resources for the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) for the three-year period of 2007-2010. The priorities, plans and activities are fully integrated with the business priorities and plans of the CSC Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP).

The Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management will adapt to any changes made in the business priorities of CSC and will be updated on an annual basis. Regional and Sector activities in the area of Human Resource Management flow from this Strategic Plan.

The results emanating from the Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management will contribute to the achievement of effective human resource management and will be assessed against the performance measures set out in the People Component of the Management Accountability Framework.

The CSC Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management represents an important step forward towards the transformation of human resource management in CSC and its contribution to public service-wide initiatives related to Public Service renewal.

Operating Environment of CSC

The Correctional Service of Canada is an agency within the portfolio of Public Safety. The portfolio brings together key federal agencies dedicated to public safety, including the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the National Parole Board, the Canada Border Services Agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, and three review bodies, including the Office of the Correctional Investigator.

CSC contributes to public safety through the custody and reintegration of offenders. More specifically, CSC is responsible for administering court-imposed sentences for offenders sentenced to two years or more. This includes both the custodial and community supervision parts of an offender's sentence. CSC also administers post-sentence supervision of offenders with Long Term Supervision Orders (LTSOs) for periods of up to 10 years.

At the end of the 2005-2006 fiscal year, CSC was responsible for approximately 12,700 federally incarcerated offenders (excluding 1,200 offenders temporarily detained while on conditional release to the community) and 6,800 offenders actively supervised in the community.Footnote 1 Over the course of the year, including all admissions and releases, CSC managed a flow-through of 25,500 different offenders.Footnote 2

CSC has a presence from coast to coast – from large urban centres with their increasingly diverse populations, to remote Inuit communities across the North. CSC manages 58 institutions, treatment centres, four Aboriginal healing lodges, 16 community correctional centres and 71 parole offices. In addition, CSC has five regional headquarters that provide management and administrative support and serve as the delivery arms of CSC's programs and services. CSC also manages an addictions research centre, a correctional management learning centre, regional staff colleges and national headquarters. It also operates CORCAN industries.

CORCAN, a Special Operating Agency of CSC, provides work and employability skills training to offenders in institutions to enhance job readiness upon their release to communities, and to increase the likelihood of successful reintegration. It also offers support services at 37 community-based employment locations across Canada to assist offenders on conditional release in securing employment. CORCAN's services are provided through partnership contracts internally (CSC and CORCAN) as well as externally with other governments, NGOs and private enterprises.

In addition to federally operated facilities, CSC partners with non-government organizations that manage approximately 200 community-based residential facilities which provide important programs and services to offenders on conditional release. Specialized correctional services and programs are also provided through a variety of Exchange of Service Agreements with provincial and territorial correctional and justice authorities. CSC also partners with Aboriginal communities to provide custody and supervision of Aboriginal offenders through the establishment of healing lodges under section 81 of the CCRA and through release plans under section 84 of the CCRA. There are currently four healing lodges operated by Aboriginal communities in collaboration with CSC, (section 81 agreements). There are also four CSC-operated healing lodges under Memoranda of Agreements with local Aboriginal communities.

Strategic Context

In recent years, CSC has been experiencing serious challenges in delivering on its mandate, and sustaining its contribution to public safety, due to the changing offender profile and rapidly escalating costs.

The changing offender population presents significant security and reintegration challenges for CSC. In recent years, the offender population has been increasingly characterized by offenders with extensive histories of violence and violent crimes, previous youth and adult convictions, affiliations with gangs and organized crime, serious substance abuse histories and problems, serious mental health disorders, higher rates of infection with Hepatitis C and HIV, and a disproportionate representation of Aboriginal people.

For a number of complex reasons, there has been a trend towards shorter sentences and for CSC this has meant an increase of 62% in the proportion of male offender admissions serving a sentence of less than three years.

The result is an increasing polarization of our population, with approximately one in four male offenders and one in three women offenders serving sentences of three years or less, and approximately one in four male offenders and one in five women offenders serving life sentences — adding greatly to the complexity of the management challenges in our institutions.

The trend lines for the changes in the composition of the offender population clearly illustrate that CSC should expect this transformation to continue for the foreseeable future. Effective management of this more complex offender population requires greater resources, new training and equipment for staff, an increase in specialized services (e.g., mental health care for offenders) and more distinct and targeted interventions. The additional effort and related costs associated with the effective management of the more diversified and complex population present a very significant challenge for CSC.

Financial Resources

Approximately 72% of CSC's 2006-2007 annual reference level was dedicated to the provision of care and custody of offenders in institutions and in communities, which includes such fixed costs as security systems, salaries for correctional staff, facilities maintenance and food. The remaining 28% was allocated to rehabilitation and case management services.

  2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Financial Resources ($Millions) $1,870.0 $1,894.7 $1,929.4

Ninety percent of CSC's expenditures are non-discretionary (e.g., salaries, utilities, food, medical services) and are driven by factors beyond CSC's control (e.g., the changing offender profile, inflation and price fluctuations). This leaves very limited flexibility for policy and program modifications, or investments that could yield longer-term results.

As a result of a serious funding shortfall, an infrastructure deficit and a changing offender profile, the operational impacts being felt by CSC includes growing pressures from employees, unions and managers at all levels to reduce workload and stress; and limitations to the ability to attract, train and retain employees.

The CSC Workforce

CSC employs approximately 14,500 staffFootnote 3 across the country and strives to maintain a workforce that reflects Canadian society. Slightly more than 5% are from visible minority groups, approximately 4% are persons with disabilities, and approximately 7% are Aboriginal.Footnote 4 These rates are at or above the labour market availabilityFootnote 5 of workers in these operational groups for the types of employment offered by CSC. Just under 45% of CSC staff are women.

Two occupational groups, for the most part exclusive to CSC, represent over half of all staff employed in operational units. The CX, or correctional officer/primary worker group, comprises 41% of staff, while another 13% of staff are in the WP category, that is, the group which includes parole and program officers who work in the institutions and in the community. The remainder of CSC's workforce reflects the variety of other skills required to operate institutions and community offices – from health professionals, to electricians, to food service staff, as well as staff providing corporate and administrative functions at the local, regional and national levels. All staff work together to ensure that the institutions operate in a secure and safe fashion and that offenders are properly supervised upon release.

CSC employs 100% of the CX group (correctional officers/primary workers) and nearly 85% of the WPs (Parole Officers and Program Officers) in the federal Public Service. In addition, CSC is a major federal employer of other groups: 76.6% of Psychology (PS) group; 34% of Nursing (NU) group and 17.9% of the General Services (GS) group. CSC's workforce reflects the variety of skills required for the operation of its institutions and community offices –The ten largest occupational groups at CSC are: CX, WP, CR, AS, GL, NU, GS, PS, FI and CS.

Bargaining agents play an important role in CSC. In addition to the ongoing cycle of collective bargaining at the Public Service level, representation by bargaining agents is active in areas such as grievance administration, occupational health and safety, disability and human rights issues. CSC actively engages in labour-management consultation through an extensive committee framework at the national, regional and local levels.

There are six bargaining agents in CSC. The Union of Solicitor General Employees, (USGE) represents approximately 44% of the CSC workforce. The Union of Canadian Correctional Officers, (UCCO-SACC-CSN), represents correctional officers/primary workers at the CX-01 and CX-02 levels which is approximately 38% of the workforce. The Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada, (PIPSC) represents approximately 9% of the workforce whereby the Canadian Association of Professional Employees, (CAPE) represents 200 employees. The Association of Canadian Financial Administration, (ACFA) represents just over 200 employees and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, (IBEW) represents a small number of employees from the Electronics occupational group.

Governance of the Human Resources Management Function in CSC

The Roles and Responsibilities at the management level for all matters related to human resources are outlined in the document titled: Human Resource Management: Governance, Roles and Responsibilities. (see attached in Annex A). The Commissioner has overall accountability for human resource management for the Correctional Service of Canada. The Commissioner sets the strategic direction and priorities for human resource management.

The Assistant Commissioner Human Resource Management (ACHRM) is accountable to the Commissioner as the functional authority for developing frameworks, plans, policies, national processes and performance measures as well as ensuring monitoring and reporting related to all aspects of human resource management. The ACHRM leads the development of the Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management to provide functional direction and guidance to Deputy Commissioners, Assistant Commissioners and delegated managers with respect to national human resource management issues.

Deputy Commissioners as well as the Assistant Commissioners are accountable for the implementation of many of the aspects of human resource management. The CSC Instrument of Delegation of Authorities in the area of Human Resource Management outlines the delegation of authorities.

The National Human Resource Management Committee (NHRMC) assists the Commissioner and members of the Executive Committee (EXCOM) in fulfilling their obligations with respect to human resource management. It is guided by legislation and government-wide policies for human resource management. NHRMC is a sub-committee of EXCOM.

Priorities of the Correctional Service of Canada

In 2005-2006, CSC undertook a comprehensive process to identify its corporate priorities. Five priorities for 2006-2007 and beyond, were established in response to the changing offender profile, the paramountcy of public safety and the new Government's emphasis on crime prevention. CSC specifically limited the number of priorities and associated plans in order to ensure sustained management focus and results in those areas. This year, CSC reviewed its existing priorities against its mandate and its key risks and challenges, and determined that it could most effectively contribute to public safety by maintaining the same priorities, namely:

  • Safe transition of eligible offenders into the community;
  • Safety and security for staff and offenders in our institutions;
  • Enhanced capacities to provide effective interventions for First Nations, Métis and Inuit offenders;
  • Improved capacities to address mental health needs of offenders; and
  • Strengthened management practices.

Priorities for Human Resources Management in CSC (2007- 2010)

Strengthening management practices is a key priority for CSC. CSC is committed to ensuring that there is a robust and effective organization that is able to deliver on its key operational priorities and other activities in a cost-effective manner. CSC is also committed to doing this in a way consistent with Public Service values that are essential to creating a healthy workplace and to maintaining the confidence and trust of Canadians. Specific priorities and plans are based on CSC's most recent Management Accountability Framework (MAF) assessment and Corporate Risk Profile. The MAF establishes the standards for management in the Government of Canada and is the basis for management accountability between departments/agencies and the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS), and the Public Service Human Resources Management Agency (PSHRMAC). The 10 elements of the MAF collectively define “management” and establish the expectations for good management of a department or agency.

Four priorities have been identified for human resource management over the 2007/2010 period:

  1. Strengthened human resource management practices, tools and capacity
  2. An effective representative workforce
  3. Learning, training and development to meet future business needs
  4. Improved workplace health and effective and responsive labour relations.

The numerous activities outlined in this Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management contribute to the CSC business priorities as well as to the transformation of Human Resource Management in CSC and specifically to the business priority of "strengthened management practices".

It is important to stress that in order to support Sectors at NHQ and the operational sites that a comprehensive business analysis of the management of Human Resources in CSC will take place. It is anticipated that this business analysis exercise will flag gaps in human resource management and will highlight what support managers at all levels of the organzation need to meet the business requirements related to recruitment, staffing, retention and development of our human resources. The concerns that will surface as a result of the business case will be addressed at NHRMC and EXCOM in order to propose various solutions to support manager's efforts in these areas.

The priorities, plans and activities in the CSC Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management were developed based on the Risk Profile for Human Resource Management in CSC. Each priority and accompanying plans and activities addresses a specific element of that risk. Together, they are integrated with CSC's business priorities to deliver clear results. The priorities, plans and activities also contribute to the achievement of the challenges put forth by the Clerk of the Privy CouncilFootnote 6 for the Public Service as a whole, namely:

  • Clear roles, responsibilities and accountabilities across government;
  • Teamwork and a culture of excellence in public service;
  • Renewal in the public service;
  • Leadership;
  • Longer-term strategic planning to prepare today for the global challenges of tomorrow and;
  • Diversity of views – linguistically, geographically and culturally, developed by a team made up of different perspectives.

Attracting and retaining an innovative and representative workforce with the appropriate skills to meet CSC's business needs at all levels of the organization is fundamental to the sustainability of correctional results for the future. This requires effective human resource tools and processes, a strong human resource capacity, human resource plans integrated to business planning and linked to business priorities, an ethical and respectful work environment, essential training and learning and developmental opportunities.

Strengthened Human Resource Management Practices, Tools and Capacity

Attracting and retaining a competent and representative workforce with the appropriate skills to meet CSC's business needs at all levels of the organization is fundamental to the sustainability of correctional results today and into the future.

Given Canada's changing demographics and projected labour shortages in key areas of the organization, CSC will concentrate its efforts on implementing its Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management that will support the organization to systematically address these challenges. This plan focuses on recruitment, retention, succession planning, workplace health, leadership development, training, and on knowledge transfer to ensure CSC's business needs will be met. In addition, it includes strengthening human resource management practices, building human resource capacity and modernizing human resource processes.

The Public Service at the current time is experiencing a shortage in human resource professionals at all levels. This shortage is also evident at the national, regional and local levels at CSC. Consequently, the capacity and capability in human resources management required to deliver services are at risk. This risk translates into the potential scenario of not having the required human resource professionals to assist CSC in meeting its business needs.

The Public Service Modernization Act (PSMA) introduced changes in the way the federal Public Service hires and manages its employees. The legislation modernized the staffing system to improve the federal Public Service's ability to attract and hire the right people; it fosters more constructive and harmonious labour management relations to improve the quality of the workplace; and it promotes a more corporate approach to learning and development through the creation of the Canada School of Public Service.

The goal of these changes is that the nature of human resource management will be less transactional and more strategic in nature. To this end, human resources professionals require broader competencies.

Integrated planning is central to the successful implementation of the PSMA and to the promotion of a healthy organization that retains competent, committed and engaged employees. There is recognition at all levels of government that over the last ten years, the human resource planning capacity across the Public Service of Canada has diminished. The time is right to rigorously rebuild capacity in human resource planning. The need for sound human resource planning, integrated with business planning, has never been more important.

Integrated, rigorous planning can mitigate risks associated with carrying out CSC business by forecasting and implementing strategies and activities for effective recruitment, retention, learning and development, employee engagement, promotion, succession, employment equity, cultural competencies, official languages.

The nature of the business of the Correctional Service of Canada translates into a challenging work environment. This challenging environment has the effect of creating labour-management relations that are more complex than in other departments. In this regard, CSC is committed to strengthen labour relations through its extensive experience with labour-management consultations at the local, regional and national levels. CSC compensation issues are also unique due to a high number of staff movement, deployments, overtime requirements which create additional workloads in this area.

When compared to other government departments, human resource professionals in CSC experience a larger and a more complex workload, which creates recruitment and retention challenges. In addition, data from Public Service statisticsFootnote 7 show that CSC has one human resource advisor (PE group) for every 86.3 employees, whereas the Public Service average is one human resource advisor (PE) for every 50.3 employees. This, coupled with the Public Service-wide shortage in human resource specialists, particularly in the compensation function, CSC must put into place strategies to attract competent and experienced human resource advisors as well as develop existing advisors in order to increase capacity nationally.

The demographics of the human resource advisors in the Public Service at large, show a bi-modal picture. Many of the human resource advisors are near retirement. The other end of the spectrum has very young advisors newly hired into the Public Service. In addition, CSC faces challenges recruiting human resource advisors since most of its regional headquarters are located away from the regional offices of other government departments. CSC has taken measures to address the shortages in human resources by participating in Public Service-wide human resource community recruitment campaigns and capacity building activities.

Compensation is a critical area that needs renewal. With the ageing population in the Public Service, the shortage of specialists in compensation must be addressed. CSC currently has a ratio of one compensation advisor for 175 employees, ratio of 1:175, whereas best practice has established a ratio of 1:150 in the Public Service, this, in less complex departments/agencies. Recruitment of compensation advisors is currently underway however a comprehensive plan will be developed to address critical challenges.

It has become apparent that the current infrastructure utilized by human resources does not permit the timely analysis of data, the identification of data quality issues or the provision of adequate support for all levels of management so that sound, timely decisions can be made. Due to these problems senior management, in particular, are being required to make decisions based on data that should be more accurate.

The ACHRM and the Chief Information Officer, (CIO), recognize and accept that a comprehensive business process re-engineering exercise for human resources is both warranted and timely in order to enable success in human resources management in CSC over the long term.

To ensure success, the CIO will apply the significant experience and expertise of the Information Management Services (IMS) Branch in conducting such processes, as evidenced by what was accomplished in the Offender Management System Renewal project and the Health Information Management project and the development of the Criminal Justice Information Library (CJIL) Data Warehouse and Corporate Reporting Systems, the latter two are designed to support corporate decision-making. A similar inclusive methodology will be applied to the human resource management domain. As part of this undertaking, lessons learned from IMS' Paperless Offender File project and other current projects will also be leveraged as appropriate.

The development of some of the individual components of the project will begin in the short term. The integration of the Human Resource Management System (HRMS) data into the Criminal Justice Information Library (CJIL), the development of enhanced data quality data bases, the development of specific data cubes and the development of various front-ends, possibly a dashboard-like report to name a few.

Measurement Strategy

The results for the priority of "strengthening human resource management practices, tools and capacity", will be measured by:

  • A reduction in the number of vacancies of human resource advisor positions in key human resource areas compared to the vacancy rates of human resources advisors at the Public Service level.
  • A demonstrated improvement in the delivery of training and in development activities for the specialized areas of human resources.
  • A demonstrated improvement in data quality and standardized processes measured through active monitoring.
  • A demonstrated improvement in internal communication concerning human resource matters.

The following risk statement was included in the CSC Corporate Risk Profile. This statement illustrates the scenario that would emerge if CSC took no action to address its objective of strengthening human resource capacity and tools.

Risk Statement - CSC will not have the required capacity or tools in Human Resources

(Please refer to Annex B for a list of acronyms found in the tables)

Strengthened Human Resource Management Practices, Tools and Capacity
Deliverables OPI Year One
2007-08
Year Two
2008-09
Year Three
2009-10
1. Plan: Improve planning and governance
Semi-Annual HR Risk Profile is developed ACHRM (SA) Ongoing Annually Ongoing Annually Ongoing Annually
Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management is implemented across all regions and sectors ACHRM
EXCOM
April 2007 Ongoing Ongoing
A Monitoring and Reporting Framework is developed ACHRM
(SA)
July 2007 Ongoing Ongoing
Roles and Responsibilities all implemented for all HR disciplines ACHRM
EXCOM
September 2007 Consistent application of R & R Consistent application of R & R
A Business Case is developed to address gaps in the Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management ACHRM September 2007 Gaps Addressed over plan period Gaps Addressed over plan period
Internal Communication and Results are improved through the establishment of Service Standards ACHRM
(DGs HRM)
EXCOM
(RAHR)
Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing
Audit and evaluation action plans are implemented ACHRM
(DGs HRM)
EXCOM
(RAHR)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
2. Plan: Renew Human Resource Policy Framework
A Review Cycle for HR Policy Framework is established. Annex C lists the policies for review in 2007/2008. ACHRM
(DGs HRM)
March 2008 As per Cycle As per cycle
3. Plan: Build Human Resource Capacity
Development Program for all HR professionals including compensation specialists (with required training and certification) at the national and regional levels is established and implemented. ACHRM
(DG ODR)
(DG L&D)
(DG LRC)
EXCOM
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing as required
4. Plan: Modernize Human Resource processes and tools
A comprehensive "Business Process Re-Engineering Exercise" is implemented. ACHRM
(DGHRMS)
ACCS
(CIO)
March 2008 Over plan period Over plan period
HRMS data is integrated into CJIL; Dashboard Reports are developed; Data quality in HRMS is improved; Data Management and Reporting Protocol in established. ACHRM
(DGHRMS)
ACCS
(CIO)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
GCHRMS is upgraded to version 8.9 ACHRM
(DGHRMS)
ACCS
(CIO)
Business case September 2007 Implement complete
June 2010

An Effective Representative Workforce

Attracting and retaining an innovative and representative workforce with the appropriate skills and competencies to meet CSC's business needs at all levels of the organization is fundamental to the sustainability of correctional results today and in the future. This must be achieved in the context of the broader Public Service as well as in the context of the current labour market trends in Canada.

Labour Market Changes

The demographics of the federal Public Service show that ageing in the Public Service is more pronounced than in the broader Canadian population.Footnote 8 Fifteen years ago, federal employees between 25 and 44 years of age made up 60% of the Public Service. Today, it is largely reversed, with 50% of public servants in the 45 to 64 age range and just over 40% in the 25 to 44 age range. Almost 10% of public servants currently have at least 30 years of service. This is a three-fold increase since the year 2000.Footnote 9 In CSC, only 4.6% of all employees currently have 30 or more years of service. This may account, in part for the somewhat younger age profile of CSC employees versus their colleagues in the broader Public Service.

CSC's employee population is somewhat younger than the average age in the federal Public Service but is nevertheless ageing. In CSC, 46.1% of all employees are currently 45 or older and 30% of all CSC employees are aged 50 and above. CSC must therefore put into place robust measures to recruit, and retain a representative workforce. Key to addressing this increase in departures is a succession planning framework.

As noted above, in the last ten years the proportion of employees who are over the age of 50 has increased significantly. This is particularly the case for the management cadre and the EX minus one and EX minus two feeder groups. The number of employees leaving the CSC has risen dramatically since 2003/04 and there are approximately twice as many employees taking retirement now than five years ago. This trend is expected to continue for several more years.

In 2002/03 approximately 1.7% of employees retired. In 2006/07 the percentage increased to over 3.2%. When the EX cadre is examined the result is even more striking.

In the executive ranks, ageing in the Public Service is more prevalent. In CSC the average age of executives and equivalents is currently 51.3 years, which is comparable to the broader Public Service.

The current cyclical strength of the labour market in Canada shows that Canada has a very competitive but ageing labour market and the unemployment rate is at a 30-year low. This is expected to continue as shown in the research presented by Dr. Linda Duxbury, Professor at Carleton University, titled Future Trends in the Public Service: Meeting the Needs of the 21st Century Public Service whereby within the next decade, for every two people who are retiring there will be less than one person to take their place.

Moving ahead on Public Service renewal applies to CSC. As noted by the Clerk of the Privy Council, renewal entails a targeted, pragmatic, results-oriented approach that takes into account the rethinking of our recruitment model. Recruitment must be a senior executive priority. Personalized development approaches must be taken to ensure career-long development strategies. We also need to rethink our retention model in order to accommodate a more flexible workforce, this would include more mid-career hiring, more interchanges, more diversity, better succession planning. We must also improve our human resource management toolkit to allow for more flexibility, more delegation, consistent with Public Service values, mentoring for succession and knowledge transfer.

The integration of human resource planning and business planning is the foundation for assessing and understanding the current and future needs of CSC. It is central to the success of activities that promote a workplace that is healthy, as well as recruitment, retention of competent, committed and engaged employees.

Integrated, rigorous planning can mitigate risks associated with carrying out CSC business by forecasting and implementing strategies and activities for effective recruitment, retention, learning and development, employee engagement, promotion, succession, employment equity, cultural competencies and official languages.

A comprehensive workforce profile for each occupational group and positions that are deemed to be business critical will be developed and analyzed in order to provide data supporting trends and in support of forecasting for decision-makers.

Language, Diversity, and Cultural Competency

The quality of the interactions between CSC staff and offenders, whether in the institutional or community setting is key. Consequently, the ability of staff to communicate effectively with offenders is paramount. CSC staff members represent the communities from which offenders come and in order to be most effective they must act as role models of those communities. Consequently, CSC faces a number of challenges with regards to official languages and employment equity.

Depending on location, under the Official Languages Act, CSC must provide services in both languages to the communities it serves. The offenders are members of the public and given that offenders are not always incarcerated in their home communities, this often means that CSC is required to provide second-language services in areas where the second-language community is relatively small. This can make recruiting qualified, bilingual staff for specialized areas such as health-care and program delivery challenging. Encouraging staff to relocate with their families to areas that do not support a thriving second-language community can also be challenging, given the geographic dispersal of CSC's institutions and community offices.

While language training can assist CSC to meet its needs, it is only one part of the equation; language retention is an important element and this can be a significant challenge in the absence of a vibrant second-language community to support the employee's use of his/her newly acquired skills.

Just as it is necessary for CSC to be able to communicate with its offenders in their language of choice, in order to be effective, so it is important for CSC to demonstrate to offenders that members of their communities can be and are law-abiding citizens. It is well-known that Aboriginal persons are disproportionately represented in the criminal justice system; however other minority groups are also over-represented, for example Afro-Canadians in the offender population in CSC's Atlantic Region.

CSC is the second-largest employer of Aboriginal persons in the federal Public Service. In addition, CSC meets or exceeds labour-market availability of almost all employment-equity groups. However, given the disproportionate representation of some groups in the offender population, CSC must strive to ensure that its workforce is representative of the populations it serves.

CSC has identified responses to the needs of the Aboriginal offender population as a business priority and is committed to increasing representation of Aboriginal persons in the workforce and in enhancing the cultural competency of employees to more effectively interact with Aboriginal offenders nationally. For example, CSC is currently seeking the authority from the Public Service Commission to put into place approaches that will assist in appointing qualified Aboriginal individuals in regions where business needs exceed labour market availability.

CSC is committed to continue to demonstrate leadership in the implementation of Employment Equity (EE) initiatives and is committed to respect its obligations as described in the Employment Equity Act. Effective assistance to managers in the use of the tools introduced as a result of the changes to the Public Service Employment Act, (such as an expanded area of selection or advertised processes open to a particular EE group) as well as better accountability through a framework for EE are key elements in helping achieve and sustain a more representative workforce.

Recruitment, Succession Planning and Collective Staffing

Strategies will be developed for recruitment, succession planning and collective staffing. National and Regional recruitment and retention strategies will be developed for Correctional Officers/Primary Workers; for Health Professionals; for Parole Officers; Finance Officers and Auditors.

Directed recruitment activities at universities and colleges throughout the country will take place and recruitment successes will be lead by the senior executive team of CSC. CSC recruits between 500 and 600 individuals annually into indeterminate positions. Over the 2007-2010 period, this number is expected to quadruple.

The predominant workforce groupings within CSC where external recruitment is used for indeterminate positions are correctional officers/primary workers, parole officers, health care professionals (doctors, nurses, psychologists) and trades. CSC also recruits researchers, professional groups (financial officers, auditors, computer scientists, engineers, planners, architects), and teachers externally although not to the extent of the more operational groups.

External recruitment of correctional officers/primary workers has traditionally targeted community colleges across the country as well as community job fairs. This process, while successful in some areas of the country, has not produced the results required in areas where there are higher paying job opportunities (Alberta and British Columbia) or where there is competition by law enforcement organizations for the same individuals. In the coming year, Deputy Commissioners will be meeting with the police, law enforcement and corrections programs at community colleges to generate new interest in CSC. In addition, they will be piloting joint recruitment initiatives with other criminal justice agencies, provincial governments, police/law enforcement organizations. This will enable an integrated approach to recruitment of the same labour market rather than a competitive approach.

Parole officer recruitment will continue to target criminology, sociology and psychology programs at universities throughout the country. In the past, CSC has relied on the Public Service Commission's job site for its intake. Starting in 2007, Regional Deputy Commissioners and their executive teams, along with the Deputy Commissioner Women, will personally visit schools in their regions in order to meet with potential graduates. For criminology programs in particular, guest lecture opportunities for CSC managers will be sought throughout the year and students will be encouraged to take a CO-OP or summer placement with CSC during their studies. CSC is fortunate to have a number of employees who are also adjunct professors at many of the criminology programs.

Recruitment of health care professionals tends to be more difficult than for correctional officers/primary workers or parole officers due to the current labour market situation and the type of work CSC offers in this area. The Pacific Region is actively engaged in interdepartmental collective staffing initiatives. In addition, opportunities are being sought to build relationships with municipal and regional health authorities. Work is ongoing with some nursing schools as well to explore opportunities for recruitment. To date, Pacific Region has been proactive with advertisements in nursing magazines and nursing recruitment fora.

Collective staffing approaches will also be used to support recruitment and to support ongoing staffing needs of large groups in CSC. This approach, introduced with the changes to the Public Service Employment Act, will assist CSC in ensuring an ongoing supply of individuals ready to take on work in a variety of positions. The collective staffing approach will prevent the need to launch an advertised process every time there is a vacancy.

Succession planning has been identified as a top priority among senior leaders in both the private and public sectors. CSC will develop a framework for succession planning that meets the needs of the organization to address the leadership and workforce continuum.

CSC must be clear on its expectations in the area of succession planning. The program will be implemented firstly at the executive level and its feeder groups. The program will then be tailored for all other groups in CSC.

The correctional environment has been changing over the past decade, with an increasingly diverse and challenging offender population, including more offenders with violent or mental health histories, gang or organized crime affiliations, and high levels of substance abuse and medical needs. This has led to the need to establish a strong focus on daily institutional security and offender population management. Given the constantly changing environment, CSC is committed to ensuring front line staff have the clarity of roles and responsibilities required to carry out CSC's legislative mandate in the most effective manner possible. More specifically,

  • Implementing the Institutional Management Structure and the Correctional Officer Deployment Standards Review. This includes new deployment standards and the introduction of key new positions over the next two-year period.
  • Working with UCCO-SACC-CSN to develop a more effective and efficient scheduling practice in CSC. This will be based on a set of co-developed (union and management) scheduling principles.
  • Implementing the Human Resource Strategy related to the Infrastructure of the Parole Districts.
  • Implementing the Human Resource Strategy tailored to the facilities for women offenders as well as for the Women Offender Sector at NHQ.
  • Implementing the Human Resource Strategy for the New Health Services Governance Structure.
  • Implementing the Human Resource Strategy for the CSC Victims Services

Measurement Strategy:

The results for the priority of an "Effective Representative Workforce" will be measured by:

  • A demonstrated improvement in Employment Equity and Official Languages results;
  • A demonstrated improvement in succession planning for the EX group as well as its feeder groups in support of CSC's leadership and business needs and,
  • A reduction in vacancies in key areas.

The following risk statement was included in the CSC Corporate Risk Profile. This statement attempts to illustrate the expected result if CSC takes no action to address its objective of attracting and retaining an effective representative workforce.

Risk Statement - CSC will not be able to achieve an effective representative workforce.
An effective representative workforce:
Deliverables OPI Year One
2007-08
Year Two
2008-09
Year Three
2009-10
1. Plan: Strategies for recruitment, succession planning and collective staffing
The National Framework and Guidelines for HR Planning is established and implemented ACHRM
(DGHRMS)
EXCOM
(RAHR)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
Comprehensive workforce profiles for each occupational group and business critical positions are developed ACHRM
(DGHRMS)
RDC
(RAHR)
June 2007 June 2008 June 2008
National timely and efficient recruitment and retention strategy tailored to meet CSC business needs ACHRM
(DGODR)
EXCOM
(RAHR)
CAE
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
A National Strategy for recruiting Aboriginal employees to meet CSC's business needs is implemented. SDC
(DGAI)
ACHRM
(DGODR)
EXCOM
(RAHR)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
The HR Strategy for National Women Offender Institutions is implemented. DCW
ACHRM
(DGHRMS/ DGODR)
RDCs
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
The HR Strategy for the Institutional Management Structure and Deployment Standards Initiative is implemented ACCOP
/ACHRM
(DGODR)
(Initiative Team)
RDCs
(RAHR)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
Governance Structure Health Services - HR Strategy is implemented. ACCOP
(DGHS)
ACHRM
(DGODR)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
The HR Strategy for the District Infrastructure is implemented ACCOP
(DGOPR)
ACHRM
(DGODR)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
Collective Staffing framework is designed and implemented ACHRM
(DGODR)
RDCs
(RAHR)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
Succession Planning Framework for the EX Group and EX Feeder Groups is established ACHRM
(DGODR)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
Refinements to the Executive Performance Management Process are developed and implemented. ACHRM
(DGODR)
ACPA
Define required changes, train managers and implement Refine as required Refine as required
The Performance Management Structure for employees outside the EX group is enhanced. ACHRM
(DGODR)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
National Classification Plan linked to business priorities is implemented ACHRM
(DGODR)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
Official Languages Accountability Framework is established and implemented ACHRM
(DGODR)
EXCOM
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
Employment Equity Accountability Framework is established and implemented ACHRM
(DGODR)
EXCOM
(RAHR)
  June 2008 Ongoing

Learning, Training and Development to Meet Future Business Needs

The Public Service direction in this area was articulated in the Policy on Learning, Training and DevelopmentFootnote 10 issued in January 2006. Direction on required training was provided in the Directive on the Administration of Required TrainingFootnote 11 issued in May 2006. Policy is expected in the coming months with respect to the core Knowledge Elements required for all levels within the Public Service. These Knowledge Elements will form the basis for the future design of learning, training and development activities.

While the importance of learning, training and development for improving the performance of staff in the Public Service has been recognized for some time, some new dimensions have begun to be recognized.

Specifically, in a labour market which will become increasingly competitive, the ability to recruit and retain high quality employees will be affected by the degree to which the employer is able to meet the desires of employees for ongoing learning and development. Although the degree of importance will differ according to the nature of the employees' areas of work, it is clear that talented persons are increasingly making employment decisions based in a significant way on the potential they see of continuing to grow in their area of specialization and in their general abilities. Such decisions include both the decision to accept employment and the decision to stay with the current employer.

Within the Public Service, learning needs are being conceptualized in a four-tier schema:

  1. needs common across the Public Service
  2. needs common across a Department or Agency
  3. needs common across a functional community
  4. developmental needs

The majority of activity in elements 1 and 3 will emanate from central initiatives led by the Public Service Human Resource Management Agency of Canada (PSHRMAC), the Canada School of the Public Service (CSPS) and the champions of functional communities. CSC will play a contributory role in these areas. It is probable that CSC will have to continue to address some needs in element 3, particularly for those functional communities for which we are a major employer (e.g. Psychologists) or for which there are unique requirements (e.g. IM/IT interactivity with highly secure networks).

Element 2 will be the primary responsibility of the Learning, Training and Development function within CSC. This element includes departmental-specific orientation programs (e.g. Correctional Training Program, Parole Officer Orientation, New Employee Orientation Program); skill development programs that are required in the correctional environment (e.g. firearms, self-contained breathing apparatus, chemical agents and munitions, personal safety, women-centered training, etc.), and departmental specific training for supervisors and managers (e.g. Crisis Management Training Program, etc.).

Element 4 (developmental needs) will be partially addressed through centrally-led programs or approaches (e.g. Management Trainee Program, Career Assignment Program, Leadership Development programs of the CSPS, etc.). However, such programs have limited capacity and currently are often cost-prohibitive for CSC, given the other demands on learning resources.

There will therefore remain a large area of responsibility and effort for CSC to create and maintain developmental learning and opportunities for its own employees in order to have individuals prepared to take on greater responsibilities and to retain our highly skilled employees.

CSC has invested a significant amount of resources in an attempt to ensure that staff members receive the training necessary to remain competent and safe in their current roles. The National Training Standards ensure through careful monitoring, that employees receive required training. Further, CSC has invested in the establishment and operation of a management learning centre to promote the learning of management skills appropriate to the correctional context, and to promote the development of nationally-consistent approaches based on policy and sharing of best practices. The recognized need for learning activities and the demand from staff and bargaining agents exceeds the capacity of current CSC resources and structures for such activities.

In order to address this situation, a number of initiatives are underway and/or planned for in the next fiscal-year. Key amongst these are:

  1. a redefinition of the roles and responsibilities related to learning, training and development –implementation during FY 2007-08.
  2. a redefinition of the National Training Standards - implementation during FY 2007-08.
  3. the renewal of the Learning and Development Policy Framework via the issuance of Guidelines covering the implementation of the Public Service Policy on Learning, Training and Development; Administration of Required Training within the CSC; Educational Support for Employees; Developmental Language Training.
  4. the creation of a planning framework that will capture planned Learning, Training and Development activities sponsored by all Regions and Sectors and report on actual achievements against the plan at the conclusion of each Fiscal Year.

Over the next three years

The following section describes specific initiatives over the three-year planning horizon designed to modernize current activities in order to better address needs while reallocating some resources to address gaps. The primary gap areas evident at the moment are:

  • skills refresher-training for Correctional Officers/Primary Workers;
  • developmental learning opportunities for all groups of employees; and
  • access to developmental language training.

The latter two areas have an impact on both the recruitment and the retention of employees.

As the implementation of current initiatives to change organizational structures and to enhance succession planning proceeds, it is probable that learning initiatives will be required to support these change projects.

Measurement Strategy:

The results for the priority of "learning, training and development to meet future needs" will be measured by:

  • Recruitment, retention and succession linked to training, learning and development. The measurement strategy will be developed in 2007-2008;
  • An increase in the proportion of staff participating in learning/training activities;
  • A demonstrated increase in the number of training days recorded and reported.
  • A developmental Language Training Framework in place to meet CSC needs;
  • Activities in the CSC Corporate Learning Plan are implemented in compliance with the Public Service Learning & Development Policy.

The following risk statement was included in the CSC Corporate Risk Profile. This statement attempts to illustrate the expected result if CSC takes no action to address its objective learning, training and development to meet future needs.

Risk Statement - CSC will not be able to provide its workforce with the training and development essential for the future.
Plans for Learning, training and development to meet future business needs
Deliverables OPI Year One
2007-08
Year Two
2008-09
Year Three
2009-10
1. Plan: Training approaches and tools modernized, linked to recruitment, retention and safety
Training programs are delivered in compliance with the Revised National Training Standards and the Directive on Required Training ACHRM
(DGL&D)
EXCOM
ongoing ongoing ongoing
PSMA training is delivered. ACHRM
(DGL&D)
(DGODR)
(DGLRC)
March 2008 Ongoing as required Ongoing as required
Training for the Institutional Management and Deployment Standards Initiative is designed and delivered. ACHRM
(DGL&D)
ACCOP
(Initiative Team)
March 2008 ongoing ongoing
The redesigned Correctional Training Program is implemented ACHRM
(DGL&D)
January 2008 ongoing ongoing
The Correctional Management Learning Centre (CMLC) programs are adapted to the Canada School of the Public Service (CSPS) programs ACHRM
(DGL&D)
March 2008 ongoing ongoing
Training and professional development related to the Health Care Governance is developed and implemented ACCOP
(DGHS)
ACHRM
(DGL&D)
March 2008 ongoing ongoing
A developmental language training framework is developed and implemented to meet CSC needs ACHRM
(DGL&D)
March 2008 ongoing ongoing
The evaluation of the Correctional Learning Management Centre (CMLC) is completed and action plan developed. ACPA
(DGE)
ACHRM
(DGL&D)
Evaluation by March 2008 Action Plan by September 2008 ongoing
A Professional Development Strategy in support of Recruitment and Succession Planning Initiatives is developed and implemented ACHRM
(DGL&D)
EXCOM
Sept 2007 ongoing ongoing
The redesigned Parole Officer Orientation Program is implemented. ACHRM
(DGL&D)
ACCOP
RDCs
  April 2008 ongoing
2. Plan: CSC Infrastructure supports training and learning needs
The Business Case is developed to support increased professional learning and development for CSC employees ACHRM
(DGL&D)
October 2007 ongoing ongoing
The CSC Corporate Learning Plan is developed and implemented in compliance with the Public Service Learning and Development Policy ACHRM
(DGL&D)
EXCOM
  April 2008 ongoing
A Program design cycle is established and implemented ACHRM
(DGL&D)
  April 2008  
An evaluation of the effectiveness of learning programs is completed ACPA     April 2009
Partnerships for training, learning and development with other organizations are explored. ACHRM
(DGL&D)
ongoing ongoing ongoing

Improved Workplace Health and Effective and Responsive Labour Relations

Improved Workplace Health

The Correctional Service of Canada is committed to improving workplace health as it is imperative to have a positive working environment.

Promoting an organizational culture that is positive and integrates accountabilities, respect, values and ethics into all of its decision-making and that makes greater use of informal resolution of conflicts will be a major priority for improving CSC's management practices and operations.

CSC is an organization founded on effective human relationships. The organization requires an accountable, harassment-free, ethical and respectful work environment. The work environment in CSC has an influence on the safety and well being of staff, volunteers and offenders. CSC's Ethics Strategy has been developed to ensure we have the right people doing the right thing.Footnote 12

In addition, the 2005 Public Service Employee Survery (PSES) results identified for CSC three major areas of concern: 1) harassment; 2) employee grievances; and 3) respect, trust and accountability. To respond to these results, CSC co-developed an action plan with its six bargaining agents. Each area of concern has planned actions, followed by next steps. Actions include increased training and awareness; clarifying roles and responsibilites; monitoring processes and trends; improving communications across all levels; ensuring that issues are resolved at the lowest level possible; and improving internal communication. CSC is confident to be now positioned to make the changes needed to address the concerns identified by its employees and move forward to create a better work environment for all staff.

An action plan to put into place an Informal Conflict Management System (ICMS) has been developed. Recent steps to move forward have included extensive consultation within CSC, and development and approval of a policy framework, as well as approval of six regional ICMS positions.

The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) in CSC is jointly supported by unions and management. The EAP assists employees with personal or work related difficulties. It also includes the Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) Program that provides education and stress management support services for employees who are involved in critical incidents due to the nature of their work. The EAP in the private sector and the public sector has evolved over the last number of years. More organizations now include prevention as a major component of EAP, focussing on contributing to the wellness of employees, the development of a positive work environment and an organizational culture that supports and respects individuals.

The Business Health Culture Index results of the recent 2005 PSES indicate that CSC employees endure a higher level of stress on the scale than other public servants. Working in a correctional environment represents a great challenge that could be very demanding at times, exposing employees to additional risk of experiencing personal or work-related difficulties. Due to the nature of the work in a correctional environment, CSC employees are regularly involved in challenging and potentially confrontational situations that place employees at risk of being exposed to violence and harassment. The security requirements and the legal aspects of the work, as well as shift-work, are additional inherent stressors. CSC employees are more likely to experience psychological and physical threat, stress, cumulative stress and mental fatigue. The EAP Management Framework will therefore be updated during the planning period and indicators established to better meet the needs of CSC employees in the area of EAP and CISM and to ensure uniformity nationally and to contribute to employee wellness and to a positive work environment.

The framework for Occupational Safety and Health will also be reviewed to position CSC to better address the safety and health issues inherent in the work environment. CSC will pursue the education of managers and staff to instil safe work habits conducive to a safer work environment that will allow for more prevention than reactive corrective measures to injury on duty. At the same time, CSC will develop a proactive approach for the management of return to work cases and allow for a greater accessibility to the return to work program and relevant placement opportunities within and outside the department.

The Recognition and Awards Program will also be the focus of a review in order to develop a framework that better responds to valuing the excellent work of CSC employees at all levels of the organization in an environment that at times can be quite challenging.

Effective and Responsive Labour Relations

The context in which labour relations is exercised in CSC is continuously evolving. The orientation of the Public Service and of CSC is to move towards stronger management practices in order to bring about a more responsive approach to labour relations that includes a greater level of accountability. An integrated strategic management approach and a cultural shift are both required to establish a strategic agenda and to have effective labour management relationships.

In terms of renewing the foundation of labour relations, CSC will make improvements by clarifying roles and responsibilities, by realigning the delegation of grievance levels and increasing management accountabilities. The Labour Management Consultation Committee Structures throughout the organization will be reviewed with a view to increase effectiveness at all levels of the organization. Dialogue with unions in various forums will be focused to move from a more transactional approach to a more strategic results-oriented approach. Mandatory training for managers in labour relations will be provided in order to afford a better understanding and resolve conflict at the lowest level which in turn should positively influence labour relations at all levels of the organization. Simultaneously, rigorous processes will be put into place to support compliance in the area of grievance management.

This strategic approach, combined with the addition of the success that is anticipated as a result of the PSES Action plan developed with all of CSC bargaining agents to address the workplace health issues will bring to CSC and provide for a more responsive labour relations culture.

Measurement Strategy:

The results for the priority of "improved workplace health and effective and responsive labour relations" will be measured by:

  • Demonstrated improvements in the way Public Service Values are reflected in the workplace using the 2005 PSES results as a benchmark.
  • Demonstrated improvement in the management of harassment complaints.
  • Timeframes for harassment investigations are improved.
  • Harassment complaints are reduced.
  • Demonstrated improvement in the management of employee grievances at each level.
  • Grievance complaints at the third level are reduced.
  • A reduction in the number of adjudication cases.

The following risk statement was included in the CSC Corporate Risk Profile. This statement attempts to illustrate the expected result if CSC took no action to address its priority to improve workplace health and effective and responsive labour relations.

Risk Statement - CSC will not be able to improve the health of its workplace.
Plans for a Healthier Workplace and Effective and Responsive Labour Relations
Deliverables OPI Year One
2007-08
Year Two
2008-09
Year Three
2009-10
1. Plan: Commitments in Co-developed response to the PS Survey are met
Harassment training is provided by site. ACHRM
(DGLRC)
November 2007 ongoing ongoing
Competency profiles are established for harassment coordinators ACHRM
(DGLRC)
June 2007 ongoing ongoing
A policy on managing harassment is developed and implemented. ACHRM
(DGLRC)
June 2007 ongoing ongoing
The roles and responsibilities related to the management of harassment and employee grievances are established ACHRM
(DGLRC)
EXCOM
June 2007 ongoing ongoing
Conflict Management Training for managers is delivered. ACHRM
(DGLRC)
November 2007 ongoing ongoing
A strategy for the use of external facilitators and investigators for harassment investigations is developed ACHRM
(DGLRC)
EXCOM
June 2007 ongoing ongoing
Trend analysis and reporting on harassment activities is completed and discussed quarterly at regional and national LMCCs ACHRM
(DGLRC)
EXCOM
June 2007 ongoing ongoing
Tracking and delivery on LMCC commitments is improved ACHRM
(DGLRC)
EXCOM
ongoing ongoing ongoing
The Grievance Delegation Strategy is implemented ACHRM
(DGLRC)
EXCOM
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
2. Plan: Integrated approach to addressing workplace wellbeing and organizational health
Health Check indicators to address harassment; employee grievances; respect, trust and accountability - for site monitoring are defined implemented. ACHRM
(DGLRC)
Bargaining Agents
Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing
The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Management framework, is implemented ACHRM
(DGHRMS)
EXCOM
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
The Program related to the Informal Conflict Management System is implemented. ACPA
(DGV&E)
December 2007 Ongoing Ongoing
A renewal of the Occupational Safety & Health, (OSH) Framework with benchmarks and performance measures is implemented. ACHRM
(DGLRC)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
Integrated Ethics Strategy and Informal Conflict Management System are implemented ACPA
(DGV&E)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
3. Plan: Effective and responsive labour relations
A strategy in regards to collective bargaining including Essential Service Agreements is established ACHRM
(DGLRC)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
Labour Relations training for managers is delivered ACHRM
(DGLRC)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
The Grievance Delegation Strategy is implemented ACHRM
(DGLRC
EXCOM)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing
There is a demonstrated improvement in the compliance and timeliness of grievance activities. ACHRM
(DGLRC)
March 2008 Ongoing Ongoing

Measuring and Monitoring of the Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management

The Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management will contribute to a more proactive approach in Human Resource Management in CSC and will allow CSC to move away from reactive Human Resource Management. A proactive approach with effective human resource management strategies will allow for the anticipation and forecast trends in order to better respond to the future needs of the organization. The CSC Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management sets out a number of plans and corresponding activities to respond to identified gaps in human resources. The implementation of the Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management will result in a stronger human resource component in CSC in support of the organization's contribution to public safety.

A strategic and consistent approach to the reporting of progress related to the CSC Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management must be established in order that the Commissioner as Deputy Head of CSC meets legislative and business requirements.

Measurement and monitoring of the Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management will be formalized and reported to the National Human Resource Management Committee on an agreed upon cycle.

Monitoring of the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management will provide an indication of the progress made against the actions outlined in the plan. The implementation will be linked to the framework of the People Component of the Management Accountability Framework (PCMAF).

In Conclusion

CSC has a workforce that is competent, professional and very dedicated to making a positive contribution to Canada's Public Safety Agenda. The dedication of CSC employees in a difficult environment is unsurpassed.

Each and every one of CSC's employees make a difference in the lives of offenders and thus in contributing to the enhancement of safety of the public.

CSC as an organization must continue to support its employees through effective human resource management by addressing the requirements outlined in this strategic plan.

CSC's Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management is aligned with key objectives listed under the People Component of the Management Accountability Framework (PCMAF):

Workforce

  • Productive
  • Principled
  • Sustainable
  • Adaptable

Workplace

  • Fair
  • Enabling
  • Healthy and Safe

The Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management is a living document that supports the CSC workforce at all levels and contributes to CSC's evolving business needs.

Annex A: Human Resource ManagementGovernance, Roles and Responsibilities

Purpose:

  • To propose principles and governance for the management of human resources in the Correctional Service of Canada, including roles and responsibilities at the management level
    • Roles and responsibilities will be developed for all of the human resource program areas (by March 2007)

General Principles:

  • CSC's success is based on having a workforce that is:
    • Productive, principled, sustainable and adaptable
    • Fair, enabling, healthy, safe and valued
    • Competent
    • Striving for excellence
    • Representative of Canada's diversity
    • Able to serve the public with integrity and in their official language of choice
  • Regional Deputy Commissioners, Assistant Commissioners and delegated managers:
    • Demonstrate leadership in promoting public service values
    • Understand their roles and responsibilities in human resource management and demonstrate positive results
    • Comply with legislation and nationally-approved policies, procedures and approaches in the discharge of their delegated HR responsibilities
    • Ensure that appropriate HR Governance is in place within their area of responsibility
    • Are committed to proactive internal communication
    • Actively address conflict through informal discussion and mechanisms at the lowest possible level

Governance Structure

Accountability Framework

  • The governance structure for human resource management consists of an accountability framework that includes:
    • Functional direction
    • Roles and responsibilities
    • Committee structure
    • Delegated authorities
    • Performance measurement

Functional Direction:

  • he Commissioner holds the overall accountability for human resource management for the Correctional Service of Canada. The Commissioner sets the HR Strategic direction and priorities.
  • The Assistant Commissioner Human Resource Management is accountable to the Commissioner.
  • The Assistant Commissioner Human Resource Management (ACHRM):
    • Is the functional authority and develops frameworks, plans, policies, national processes, performance measurement, monitoring and reporting related to all aspects of HR management
    • Produces a functional plan to provide strategic direction and guidance to Regional Deputy Commissioners, Assistant Commissioners and delegated managers with respect to national human resource management including:
      • Functional guidance on the alignment of CSC and Public Service priorities
      • Functional direction on risk and mitigation strategies in the area of Human Resource Management
      • Functional direction on the alignment of HR priorities, expected results and plans, with the CSC strategic priorities and expected results in the annual Report on Plans and Priorities;
      • Functional direction and guidance on the follow-up to audits, evaluations or assessments
      • Consistent, cohesive, coherent and integrated HR operational policy direction and guidelines
      • Coordination and strategic management of issues and activities related to corporate human resource committees
      • Establishment of a results-oriented performance measurement framework that will assist in the decision-making on human resource matters
    • Provides advice and support to the Commissioner, RDCs, ACs and delegated senior managers on all HR management issues, including the exercise of delegated authorities.

Specific Roles and Responsibilities

Assistant Commissioner Human Resource Management (ACHRM)
  • In addition to the functional direction outlined above, the ACHRM is responsible for the development of frameworks, plans, policies, national processes, performance measurement, monitoring and reporting related to:
    • Organizational design and classification
    • Succession planning framework
    • Recruitment (including collective staffing and development programs) and retention
    • Executive Resourcing
    • Performance management Process
    • Labour relations
    • Conflict resolution and recourse
    • Compensation and benefits
    • Anti-harassment and workplace well-being
    • Occupational Safety and Health and Return to Work
    • Employee Assistance and Critical Incident Stress Management
    • Awards and Recognition
    • Employment equity and diversity
    • Official languages
    • Learning and development
    • Use of the Human Resource Management System (HRMS)
    • Staffing Policy
    • Statements of Merit Criteria
  • The ACHRM is accountable for the management of the Correctional Management Learning Centre (CMLC) and the 5 regional colleges and the direct delivery of staff training.
  • The ACHRM chairs the National Human Resource Management Committee.
  • The ACHRM develops and maintains partnerships with other federal departments, provincial correctional agencies, and universities, community colleges and organizations active in HR issues.
  • The ACHRM is the Commissioner's delegated manager with authority for:
    • Classification decisions rendered by classification grievance committees
    • Use of non-imperative staffing actions for internal non-executive positions
    • Appointments, deployments, assignments, and interchanges of EX 1s to EX 3s not reporting directly to the Commissioner
Regional Deputy Commissioners
  • RDCs and ACs comply with nationally-approved policies and procedures in the discharge of their delegated responsibilities in all areas of human resource management.
  • RDCs are responsible for the development, implementation and monitoring of HR plans and HR operational processes in their region, consistent and aligned with national direction, related to:
    • Classification and organizational design
    • Succession planning
    • Regional recruitment
    • Performance management
    • Labour relations
    • Conflict resolution and recourse, including resolving conflict at the lowest possible level
    • Compensation and benefits
    • Anti-harassment and workplace well-being
    • Occupational Health and Safety and Return to Work
    • Employee Assistance and Critical Incident Stress Management
    • Awards and Recognition
    • Employment equity and diversity
    • Official languages
    • Learning and development
    • Use of the Human Resource Management System (HRMS)
  • RDCs consistent with national policies and the National Training Standards and in conformity with provincial standards (where applicable) ensure staff receive training to perform their duties
  • In addition, RDCs chair Regional Human Resource Management Committees and Regional Labour Management Consultation Committees.
Assistant Commissioners
  • ACs comply with nationally approved policies and procedures in the discharge of their duties on Human Resource Management.
  • ACs are responsible for HR Plans within their Sector, consistent and aligned with the national direction related to:
    • Recruitment
    • Performance management
    • Conflict resolution
    • Anti-harassment and workplace well-being
    • Employment equity and diversity
    • Official languages
    • Learning and development
  • ACs are the functional authority for national generic work descriptions and national statements of merit criteria.
  • ACHRM is responsible for HR operational processes in the National Capital Region including:
    • Classification and organizational design
    • Succession planning
    • Regional recruitment
    • Performance management
    • Labour relations
    • Conflict resolution and recourse, including resolving conflict at the lowest possible level
    • Compensation and benefits
    • Anti-harassment and workplace well-being
    • Occupational Health and Safety and Return to Work
    • Employee Assistance and Critical Incident Stress Management
    • Awards and Recognition
    • Employment equity and diversity
    • Official languages
    • Learning and development
    • Use of the Human Resource Management System (HRMS)
  • The ACHRM co-chairs the Labour Management Consultation Committees at National Headquarters.
Senior Deputy Commissioner
  • The National Headquarters Management Committee chaired by the Senior Deputy Commissioner convenes as the NHQ Regional Human Resource Management Committee to address HR issues.
  • The Senior Deputy Commissioner chairs the National Labour Management Consultation Committees. The ACHRM and ACCOP co-chair these committees in the SDC's absence.
Delegated managers:
  • Managers are responsible for managing human resources within their area of responsibility in accordance with relevant legislation, national and regional procedures, plans, processes, collective agreements, terms and conditions of employment, and service-wide values and principles of human resource management.
HR Advisors:
  • HR Advisors are responsible for providing managers with supporting , advisory and operational services in accordance with relevant legislation, policies, plans, processes, collective agreements, terms and conditions of employment, and service-wide values and principles of human resource management.

Delegated Authorities:

Delegated authorities are set out in the Instrument of Delegation of Authorities in the Area of Human Resource Management

Performance Measurement:

The ACHRM working in collaboration with the AC Performance Assurance is responsible for developing a performance management framework for the monitoring of HR activities and outcomes. In particular, the ACHRM is responsible for:

  • Providing senior management with a common set of results-oriented performance information that will assist them in decision making on HR related matters;
  • Developing, implementing and monitoring a comprehensive set of measures and indicators that directly address the priorities of the Service for HR management.

Original signed by

Keith Coulter
Commissioner,
Correctional Service Canada
Date: December 18, 2006

Annex B : Acronyms Tables in Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management in CSC

AC
Assistant Commissioner
ACCOP
Assistant Commissioner, Correctional Operations and Programs
ACCS
Assistant Commissioner, Corporate Services
ACHRM
Assistant Commissioner, Human Resource Management
CAE
Chief Audit Executive
CIO
Chief Information Officer
DC
Deputy Commissioner
DCW
Deputy Commissioner Women
DGAI
Director General, Aboriginal Initiatives
DGHRMS
Director General, Human Resource Management Strategies
DGHS
Director General, Health Services
DGL&D
Director General, Learning & Development
DGLR&C
Director General, Labour Relations & Compensation
DGODR
Director General, Organizational Design & Resourcing
DGOPR
Director General, Offender Programs and Reintegration
RAHR
Regional Administrators of Human Resource
RDC
Regional Deputy Commissioner
SA
Special Advisor to ACHRM
SDC
Senior Deputy Commissioner
EXCOM
Members of the CSC Executive Committee

Annex C: Policy Review Cycle

The following policy documents will be reviewed as per the approved Policy Review Cycle and completed in fiscal year 2007-2008:

  • The Executive Policy Suite;
  • Learning, Training and Development (Education Leave, Language Training) - complete update to CSC Learning Policies;
  • Anti-Harassment;
  • Overtime;
  • Attendance Management;
  • Employee Discipline;
  • Employee Assistance Program;
  • Employee Recognition and Awards Policy;
  • Use of Employer Facilities;
  • Labour Relations Grievances;
  • Compensation;
  • Collective Staffing;
  • Area of Selection;
  • Employment Equity

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Corrections and Conditional Release Statistical Overview: 2006 Annual Report (Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, Dec. 2006).

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Footnote 2

Source: CSC Offender Management System (as of April 9, 2006). As the 2006-07 fiscal year was not yet complete at the time of this report's publication, data from the 2005-06 fiscal-year will be used throughout the document.

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Footnote 3

CSC has changed its definition of ‘employee' to be consistent with the definition used by the Public Service Human Resources Management Agency of Canada. Previously, casual employees, employees on leave without pay and suspended employees were included. Data as of March 31, 2006 (Source: CSC Human Resources Management System).

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Footnote 4

Source: CSC Human Resources Management System. Employment equity data, March 31, 2006.

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Footnote 5

As per the latest available data from Statistics Canada (2001 Census Data).

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Footnote 6

PCO Website 2007 – Notes for Remarks for the ADM Forum, Kevin Lynch, Clerk of the Privy Council.

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Footnote 7

PSHRMAC – Public Service Active Employment and Payroll, 4Q 2006

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Footnote 8

Clerk of the Privy Council: Why Public Service Renewal Matters. September 15, 2006-Remarks at Dalhousie Administration.

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Footnote 9

Idem

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Footnote 10

http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pubs_pol/hrpubs/TB_856/ltd-afp_e.asp

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Footnote 11

http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pubs_pol/hrpubs/TB_856/dart-dafi/dart-dafi_e.asp

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Footnote 12

Performance Assurance Sector InFonet Page : CSC's Ethics Strategy

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