The Correctional Plan Progress Report

A Guide for Victims

The Correctional Plan Progress Report

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Organization: Correctional Service Canada

Date published: 2022-01-28

CATALOGUE NO: PS84-49/2016E

ISSN: 978-0-660-05400-1

Acronyms

The acronyms used in this document are:

CPPR
Correctional Plan Progress Report
CSC
Correctional Service of Canada

Correctional Plans and Correctional Plan Progress Reports

All offenders serving a federal sentence of two years or more with the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) have a correctional plan. At the start of an offender's sentence, CSC gets information about their lives and past crimes, interviews the offender, and completes an assessment of the information. The courts and police provide some of this information. The information and assessments form the correctional plan.

CSC evaluates and rates the offender's needs in terms of learning, substance abuse, attitudes, relationships and other topics. The protection of society and the protection of victims are among the factors that are considered in the correctional plan. The correctional plan targets what led the offender to break the law and identifies the programs that can address the issues. It prioritizes the programs and lists which should be taken in the institution and which should be taken when the offender is on release in the community.

CSC also rates how willing the offender is to:

Lastly, CSC rates whether the offender is able to live in society without re-committing crimes in the future. These ratings appear in the offender's correctional plan.

The correctional plan also tells offenders what they need to do to improve. For example, attend programs, maintain institutional employment, not receive disciplinary charges, maintain positive behaviour, and improve the ratings in their correctional plan.

CSC regularly reviews the correctional plan and updates the ratings if needed. CSC looks at what the offender is doing to meet their goals so they can return to society and obey the law. For more information about the correctional plan process, refer to:

CSC keeps victims informed about the offender's progress throughout their sentence. The Correctional Plan Progress Report (CPPR) is a summary of the offender's correctional plan and what the offender is doing to meet the goals set out in that plan. Victim Services sends CPPRs to registered victims who ask for them. Then, updated CPPRs are sent automatically every one to two years. We may send an updated CPPR earlier if the offender is being considered for release to the community. This guide will help you understand the information you get in the CPPR.

The law (Corrections and Conditional Release Act) allows CSC to share specific information with victims. This guide tells you what information you could get in a CPPR. Victims can get information about offenders who are in a CSC institution and those who are being supervised in the community. CSC must respect the offender's privacy when sharing information. This means the report you get will not include health or security-related information, etc.

CSC sends CPPRs by mail or through the Victims Portal. The Victims Portal is a free and secure service for victims where they can receive notifications, submit victim statements and set preferences electronically. We invite you to visit the website to learn more about the Victims Portal and sign up.

Victim Services Officers can also let you know by phone if the offender makes any progress. Please call your Victim Services Officer to talk about the report if you have questions, toll free at:

What do I do with this information?

With the assistance of this guide, the CPPR will provide you with some information and updates to consider throughout the offender's sentence. This could include recommended correctional programs and if they were completed, and the offender's behaviour while incarcerated. This information may help you to write a victim statement and/or prepare you to attend a Parole Board of Canada hearing, where you may decide to read your statement. For further information on victim statements and parole board hearings, please speak with your Victim Services Officer.

Having access to information in relation to the offender's progress, or lack thereof, can be important information to have especially when the offender is returning to the community. It can be helpful for safety planning and working with your local authorities so you can prepare for the offender's release. 

Correctional Plan Progress Report Format

The following information is presented in the same order as it appears in the CPPR that is shared with you. You will find that not all of the information below applies to the CPPR that you receive. This is because each CPPR is unique to each offender to meet their individual needs. The intent of this guide is to provide you with an overview of the CPPR process, what the ratings mean and some general information about how CSC works to change offenders' lives so they become law-abiding citizens. Please contact your Victim Services Officer, toll free at 1-866-806-2275, to discuss the specifics of the CPPR you receive.

Introduction

This section gives basic information about the offender:

This section also tells you when the offender is eligible for release.

See the Definitions section of this guide to learn about each type of release.

Correctional Plan

Looking at needs to address criminal behaviour

Parole officers from the institution test the offender at the beginning of their sentence. This process is called the "intake assessment". The tests show the offender's needs in eight different areas where the offender may need to improve called "Dynamic Factors".

See the Definitions section for more information about Dynamic Factors.

Dynamic Factor Signs there is Need for Improvement CSC's Expectations
1. Personal / Emotional Offender does not interact well with others. Struggles to control behaviour (anger). Has trouble solving problems in relationships. Gain skills to better manage behaviour and decisions.
2. Attitude Offender makes excuses for breaking the law. Has a negative attitude towards the law. Challenge excuses. Encourage positive attitude. Build a positive identity.
3. Associates Offender has criminal friends. Is removed from friends who could be a positive influence. Learn how to make and keep friends who could be a positive influence.
4. Substance Abuse Offender abuses alcohol and/or drugs. Reduce substance abuse. Learn better ways to cope with life.
5. Family / Marital Relationships Offender lacks parenting skills. Has poor family relationships. Learn how to be a better parent and how to show warmth and care.
6. Employment Offender has shown poor results in the past. Has shown a lack of satisfaction at work. Build stronger skills and relationships to use at work.
7. Education Offender has shown poor results in the past. Has shown a lack of satisfaction with school. Build stronger skills and relationships to use at school.
8. Community Functioning Offender is not involved in positive leisure activities. Struggles with finances. Encourage positive activities during leisure time. Encourage getting a job to bring in regular pay.

Parole officers consider multiple sources of reliable information, such as judge's comments, police reports, psychological reports and victim impact statements from court. Then they use their professional judgement to determine a rating for each of the Dynamic Factors. The table below provides the meaning of each rating.

Low Medium High Asset None
Little need to improve Some need to improve High need to improve Will help offender make progress No need to improve at this time

The Initial Rating column in the table shows the offender's rating at the start of their sentence. The Current Rating column shows the rating from the offender's most recent assessment. The last column shows if any change to the rating indicates progress.

The parole officer reviews the eight Dynamic Factors and identifies which ones played a large role in the offender's criminal behaviour. The correctional plan is designed to address these areas specifically. These areas, called contributing factors, are highlighted in yellow in the CPPR you receive.

Making the Change

CSC also assesses the offender in six areas to identify how committed the offender is to changing their criminal behaviour. These areas are:

Parole officers use the following criteria when deciding what rating to assign for each of the six areas.

1. Level of Intervention

The amount of programming and other activities needed for the offender to become a law-abiding citizen is referred to as the "Level of Intervention".

Dynamic Factors

Dynamic Factors are things that can change and be improved on. They are the eight areas in the table above. Parole officers determine what intervention is needed for the offender to meet CSC's expectations for each Dynamic Factor listed above.

To do this they use the following ratings:

Low Medium High
No dynamic factors identified (all factors rated as "none" or "asset")
or

Few dynamic factors identified and rated as "low" or "medium"
Any combination of severity and number of factors between the Low and High guidelines Few dynamic factors identified and rated as "high"
or
Multiple dynamic factors identified (regardless of severity of need)
Static Factors

Parole officers also determine how much intervention is needed to address the offender's history. These are called "Static Factors" because they normally do not change. Static Factors include:

See the Definitions section for more information about Static Factors.

When determining how much intervention is required to address the offender's Static Factors parole officers use the following ratings:

Low Medium High
The criminal offence history meets all of the following conditions:
  • Little or no involvement with the criminal justice system
  • Little or no harm to society in general and victims in particular
  • Little or no sex offending
The offender is clearly not a "low" criminal risk but does not meet the criteria to be rated as "high"

The criminal offence history meets at least one of the following conditions:

  • A lot of involvement with the criminal justice system
  • A lot of harm to society in general and victims in particular
  • A lot of sex offending

When deciding whether to adjust the Level of Intervention, the parole officer looks at:

2. Accountability

Accountability refers to whether the offender takes responsibility for their crimes. Attitude, behaviour and understanding are important here.

Low Moderate High
Takes no responsibility for their actions May not take full responsibility for their actions Takes responsibility for their actions
Does not admit their problems Does understand some of their problems Understands their problems
Does not deal with their feelings. Does not show they are sorry for the harm they caused Shows they are sorry to some extent for the harm they caused Can express their feelings. Shows they are sorry for the harm they caused
Does not understand how their actions affected their victim(s) Understands to some extent how their actions affected their victim(s) Understands how their actions affected their victim(s)
May deny or change the story of what happened May deny or change some details about what happened Admits to and understands what happened
3. Motivation

Motivation is about whether the offender wants to and is willing to change.

Low Medium High
Strongly denies the need for change or Is unwilling to take part in programs or activities that CSC recommends May not fully accept CSC's evaluation of what needs to change but will take part in programs or activities that CSC recommends Wants to change and is actively working on problem areas
4. Responsivity Issues

Responsivity refers to the offender's ability to learn from the programs and activities that CSC recommends. Responsivity issues may include a language barrier or learning and concentration problems. These problems may last a short or long time or may never improve. A rating of "no" means that the offender does not have any problems to learn from participation in programs. A rating of "yes" means the offender may have problems learning from programming. 

5. Engagement

Engagement is about whether the offender has shown they are willing to:

The rating for Engagement combines the ratings from the Motivation and Accountability areas.  A rating of "yes" means the offender is actively participating in their correctional plan. A rating of "no" means they are not.

6. Reintegration Potential

Reintegration potential looks at whether the offender can return to the community without committing crimes in the future. Parole officers calculate this using three scientific, research-based tools:

  1. Statistical Information on Recidivism (predicts whether an offender will succeed or fail in the community)
  2. Custody Rating Scale (determines the security level of the institution needed to manage the offender, how the offender adjusts to life in an institution, the risk they will escape, and the risk they pose to public safety)
  3. Static Factor rating (see Level of Intervention section above).

The parole officer then considers the Motivation rating, and the Levels of Intervention for Static Factors and Dynamic Factors. They adjust the Reintegration Potential rating using their professional judgement.

The second table in the CPPR you receive shows the ratings for these six areas. Again, you will see both the offender's rating at the start of their sentence and the rating from the most recent assessment. The last column of the table shows if any change in the rating indicates progress.

If the offender shows improvement in these areas, they are more likely to be rehabilitated and less likely to commit more crime. Offenders must follow their correctional plan, and failure to do so reduces an offender's chances of being granted parole or other forms of conditional release.

For more information about how correctional plans are developed and how progress is measured see the following policies listed in the References section:

Programs

CSC has a legal mandate to provide programs and services that address offenders' criminal behaviour. Programs are part of an offender's correctional plan and are essential in addressing the offender's criminal behaviour. Programs in the offender's correctional plan are prioritized as follows:

  1. Correctional programs: address factors that are linked to criminal behaviour. There are different types of correctional programs.
    • CSC offers the Integrated Correctional Program Model for male offenders. For more information about the Integrated Correctional Program Model, please see the References section.
    • Women offenders have unique needs that impact the way they respond to correctional programs. CSC offers correctional programs for women offenders within a women-centered perspective. For more information, see Women Offender Correctional Programs in the References section.
    • CSC delivers culturally-relevant Indigenous programs. These include programs for Indigenous men, programs for Inuit men and programs for Indigenous women. These programs meet the specific needs of Indigenous offenders, consider Indigenous social history and include Elder involvement. For more information, see Indigenous Correctional Programs in the References section.
  2. Educational programs: help offenders develop basic literacy, academic and personal development skills. For more information, see Educational Programs in the References section.
  3. Employment programs: help prepare offenders for a job in the community upon release. For more information, see Employment Programs in the References section.
  4. Social programs: provide offenders with the skills, knowledge and experiences they need for personal and social growth. Offenders do not require a referral or approval to participate in social programs. For more information, see Social Programs in the References section.

This section of the CPPR contains the third table and lists all of the correctional programs, educational programs and employment programs the offender has been referred to and which ones the offender has participated in. The table names each program, indicates the program type (from the list above) and shows the offender's status in the program. The status may include:

If you have questions about CSC's correctional programs, please discuss them with your Victim Services Officer at:

CSC also publishes detailed information about programs for offenders (see the References section).

Court-ordered financial obligations

Offenders must do what the court orders them to do. This includes making any payments ordered by the court (financial obligations). These obligations are set out as goals in the offender's correctional plan. Offenders must set up a plan to pay any amounts the court has ordered. Offenders must prove they are making payments. Their compliance with the order is reported in correctional plan updates.

When reporting on the offender's progress if they have court-ordered obligations, the CPPR will include:

Offenders make these payments directly to the courthouse where the order was made. CSC only monitors whether the offender is making payments. For this reason, CSC is unable to share the following information with victims:

The above information may be available by contacting the court that ordered the offender to pay the identified amount.

Disciplinary Offences (while incarcerated)

Inmates are expected to behave appropriately and obey the rules and conditions of the institution.

A formal disciplinary process deals with offences in the institution. First, the institution must try to use informal resolution. This means:

Sometimes informal resolution is unsuccessful. In those cases, the correctional officer completes an offence report. The report describes what the inmate has done. A manager reviews the offence report and decides whether to charge the inmate. If they do charge the inmate they must also decide whether the inmate's actions were either a:

or a:

The next step is to have a hearing to decide whether the inmate is guilty of the disciplinary offence they were charged with. There are two types of hearings:

This chart shows the punishment and the limits for minor and major offences according to the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and the Corrections and Conditional Release Regulations.

Type of punishment Limits to the punishment for minor misconduct Limits to the punishment for serious misconduct
Warning/reprimand No No
Loss of privileges Yes; no more than seven days, limited to recreational-type activities; cannot go against the inmate's correctional plan Yes; no more than 30 days, limited to recreational-type activities; cannot go against the inmate's correctional plan
Restitution Yes; no more than $50 for damaged/lost property; must consider the inmate's finances Yes; no more than $500 for damaged/lost property; must consider the inmate's finances
Fine Yes; no more than $25; must consider the inmate's finances Yes; no more than $50; must consider the inmate's finances
Suspended sentence Yes; no more than 21 days after the date of imposing punishment Yes; no more than 90 days after the date of imposing punishment
Extra work Yes; no more than ten hours of inmate's free time; no pay for doing the work Yes; no more than 30 hours of inmate's free time; no pay for doing the work

For more information, consult Commissioner's Directive 580, Discipline of Inmates (in the References section).

Urinalysis

The Corrections and Conditional Release Act allows CSC to test offenders for use of banned substances. Offenders in an institution can be asked to provide a urine sample for the following three reasons:

  1. Random testing as per the institution's urinalysis program.
  2. Reason to suspect the inmate has committed or is committing a disciplinary offence (paragraph 40(k) of the Corrections and Conditional Release Act).
  3. Needed for the offender to take part in substance abuse programs, or a program/activity involving contact with the community.

Offenders on release in the community can be asked to give a urine sample for the following two reasons:

  1. Reason to suspect an offender has broken a condition not to use alcohol or drugs.
  2. Regular testing for offenders with a condition not to use alcohol or drugs.

The CPPR reports all urinalysis tests for offenders who have substance abuse as a contributing factor to their criminal behaviour. The CPPR indicates the following:

The Privacy Act prevents CSC from disclosing the type of substance found in positive tests:

For more information about urinalysis and CSC's National Urinalysis Program:

Employment

Offenders are expected to work while they are incarcerated. Doing so helps them develop basic literacy, academic and personal development skills that will assist them to be law-abiding citizens when they return to the community. Some examples of institutional work assignments are:

Offenders are paid a daily amount while incarcerated. They can use this money to make payments towards court-ordered obligations (restitution, victim surcharge, child support, etc.), to send to their families, to purchase hobby supplies they are permitted to have, to purchase items from the canteen, etc. The level of pay offenders receive reflects their progress in meeting the goals of their correctional plan.

Level A: $6.90/weekday

Level B: $6.35/weekday

Level C: $5.80/weekday

Level D: $5.25/weekday

Allowance: $2.50/weekday

Basic allowance: $1.00/weekday

CSC reviews the offender's pay level every six months. An offender's pay level may move up or down a level based on the following:

If an offender refuses to take part in any program that is part of their correctional plan, they will remain at pay Level D when working. See:

While an offender is on release in the community, they must continue to show effort and make progress in meeting the goals of their correctional plan. This means looking for and keeping a job and attending programs. The CPPR will indicate the offender's employment status while on release to the community.

Release to the Community

Experience and studies show that most offenders are more likely to become law-abiding citizens if they participate in a program of gradual, supervised release and reintegration. The goal of community corrections is to gradually release offenders from correctional facilities when their risk is manageable and help them adjust to life outside of institutions. Except for some temporary absences and work releases, the Parole Board of Canada makes the decision to release the offender and CSC supervises the offender.

Supervision of offenders released to the community means the direct monitoring of offenders. Supervision is carried out mainly by parole officers employed by CSC who work in the community. All offenders on conditional release are supervised no matter where they live, whether in the city or remote parts of the country. The degree of supervision will depend on the offender and the risk they present. Some offenders may require closer monitoring and more frequent contact than others. This is called the Level of Intervention (see below). Offenders who are considered to be a higher risk to society will require close monitoring and more frequent contacts. Those who are lower risk will require less.

In supervising offenders, correctional staff rely on many sources of information: police, family members of the offender, program staff, employers, victims and others. By being aware of the offender's situation, correctional staff can help ensure that they stay on track. They can take action when the offender breaks rules, or they can help solve problems that could, if not addressed, lead to a new crime.

Research shows that supervision alone does not help offenders change. Supervision needs to be complemented with good programming. Programs in the community build on the gains that the offender has already made by taking part in programs when they were incarcerated.

Offenders on release may be expected to participate in programs tailored to their needs. Some programs help them cope with daily living, relationships and emotions, while others deal with specific issues such as sexual offending and alcohol or drug abuse. In some instances, it may be of benefit for offenders to upgrade their education or employment skills.

CSC's national approach to Indigenous corrections includes:

Agencies and individuals in the community also deliver programs or add to program activities. They act as counsellors, role models and support networks. Community involvement demonstrates the community's willingness to accept those offenders who reform themselves. Offenders' success in starting fresh depends partly on their own efforts and partly on the opportunities the community at large provides.

The skills, resources and experiences of many different people are needed to deal with offenders' complex problems and needs. CSC draws upon a broad network of organizations and individuals, family members, psychologists, employment counsellors, educators and others to assist in community correctional work. Such community networks provide both supervision and support. The needs of offenders involved in Indigenous culture/traditions in the community are met by Indigenous Community Liaison Officers and Indigenous Community Development Officers. These officers, who work with established communities and Elders, are often located in parole offices.

Halfway houses are owned and operated by either a non-governmental organization or a private aftercare agency. Each agency-owned facility operates under contract with CSC, providing accommodation, counselling and supervision for 15 to 30 offenders who are usually on day parole or full parole. This can also include offenders on statutory release and long-term supervision if the Parole Board of Canada has imposed a special condition requiring them to reside there.

CSC also operates 14 of its own community-based residential facilities, referred to as Community Correctional Centres. In these centres, the director, parole officers and support staff work as a team, often in cooperation with community partners, to supervise and provide programs for offenders on day parole, or those on statutory release or long-term supervision that are required to reside there.

Community parole officers are the key link to supervising offenders in the community and are crucial to managing the offender's risk of committing another crime. Their job is part police officer, part social worker. Parole supervision is based on a professional relationship with each offender and on a study of the risk factors that contribute to their criminal behaviour. The parole officer ensures the offender continues to follow their correctional plan through:

If the offender breaches parole conditions or seems likely to do so, the parole officer can take disciplinary measures, which may include taking the necessary steps to send the offender back to a CSC institution.

Parole officers are guided in their work by rules and standards. They routinely write reports on the progress of each offender and discuss cases that require additional attention with their supervisors. Officers work together with many community agencies to help secure stable housing, employment, income and positive personal contacts for the offender.

In this section of the CPPR you receive, you will be given information about the offender if/when they are serving the rest of their sentence in the community. The report you receive may contain the following information:

Suspension of an offender's release

When an offender's behaviour raises concerns in the community, CSC issues a warrant to arrest them and take them back to a CSC institution.

If their behaviour turns out to be less concerning than first thought, the parole officer can cancel the warrant, and the offender can return to the community.

In other cases, the parole officer asks the Parole Board of Canada to decide if the offender will be kept in a CSC institution or released back to the community.

The CPPR shows you when the warrant was issued, why, and its status.

Level of Intervention

While an offender is in the community, CSC looks at how much supervision the offender needs. The offender must meet with their parole officer face-to-face a number of times each month. The number is based on how well the offender is doing in the community and how much supervision, structure and support they need. Parole officers can also stay in touch with offenders by phone, outside of the set meetings. The CPPR tells you how much supervision the offender gets in the community.

For more information about the levels of supervision, consult Commissioner's Directive 715-1, Community Supervision, in the References section.

Next steps

The last section of the CPPR provides the next major event or date that is expected in the offender's sentence. This may be:

If you have any questions about the information in the CPPR you have received, please contact your Victim Services Officer.

Definitions

Day Parole

Offenders on day parole live in the community in a half-way house where they must return nightly. Only the Parole Board of Canada can grant day parole. They also decide whether to allow the offender to be away from the half-way house for up to four nights a month.

Most offenders can apply for day parole after serving one-sixth of their sentence. This is different for offenders serving a life sentence. When the court ordered the offender to serve a life sentence, the judge decided how much of the sentence the offender must serve before the offender can be considered for full parole. The date when this happens is called the offender's full parole eligibility date. Day parole is considered a lesser, more restrictive, form of parole and the offender can ask the Parole Board of Canada to consider granting them day parole three years before their full parole eligibility date.

Day parole is normally granted for up to a maximum of six months. The Parole Board of Canada must decide every six months whether to continue the day parole.

Detention

The Parole Board of Canada can keep an offender in a CSC institution past their statutory release date until the end of their sentence. The Parole Board of Canada has authority to detain an offender only when the Board is satisfied that if the offender is released they are likely to commit an offence causing death or serious harm to another person, a sexual offence involving a child, or a serious drug offence.

Dynamic Factors

Dynamic Factors are areas that present issues in a person's life that can lead to criminal behaviour. These factors can change and be improved on. CSC uses eight Dynamic Factors:

  1. Personal / Emotional
  2. Attitude
  3. Associates
  4. Substance Abuse
  5. Family / Marital Relationships
  6. Employment
  7. Education
  8. Community Functioning

Full Parole

Offenders on full parole may live on their own or with their family, work and contribute to society. The offender remains under supervision of a CSC parole officer and must continue to abide by certain conditions.

Generally, offenders are eligible for full parole after serving one-third of their sentence. Offenders serving a life sentence are eligible for full parole at the date set by the judge at the time of sentencing.

Once full parole is granted to an offender, it does not expire. As long as the offender behaves appropriately, does not break the law and follows the conditions set out by the Parole Board of Canada, the offender can remain on full parole until their sentence ends (warrant expiry) or in the case of a life sentence, until the offender dies.

Long-Term Supervision Order

The court can order that after the offender has finished their sentence, the offender will live in the community under the supervision of a CSC parole officer for as long as ten years. The judge sets the length of the supervision period at the same time that the offender is sentenced. Judges can make this order if both of the following are likely:

  1. the offender has a high risk of re-offending if the offender is returned to the community at the end of their sentence without supervision. 
  2. supervision and structure would lower the offender's risk of committing another crime.

Just like offenders on parole or statutory release, offenders on Long-Term Supervision must also follow the conditions imposed by the Parole Board of Canada. They must report to their parole officer regularly and if their risk of committing another crime becomes too high, the parole officer can suspend the supervision period and return the offender to a CSC institution while other interventions are put in place to help the offender remain crime free.

Static Factors

Static Factors are about the offender's past and the offences they have committed. Because they are in the past, these factors normally do not change. This information helps parole officers determine what makes the offender break the law and identifies the programs to address that. Static factors include:

Statutory Release

Statutory release does not apply to offenders serving a life sentence. If an offender has served two thirds of their sentence but is not yet on parole in the community, they must be released to the community, by law. Statutory release allows the offender to serve the remaining portion of their sentence in the community under the supervision of a CSC parole officer. Research, over many years, shows that offenders are more likely to become productive law-abiding citizens when they return to the community gradually, under supervision, than when they stayed in prison until the end of their sentence.

Temporary Absences

Temporary absences are the first type of release that an offender may receive. These may be authorized for various reasons, including: medical; administrative; community services; family contact; rehabilitative purposes; and, compassionate reasons such as to attend a funeral. The Parole Board of Canada, the Commissioner of CSC and institutional heads have authority to grant temporary absences. Public safety is always of paramount importance in these decisions.

Escorted temporary absences are short-term releases to the community. The offender can leave the institution to go to a specific destination. The offender is accompanied and supervised by CSC staff member(s) or a trained member(s) of the community.

Offenders are eligible for an escorted temporary absences at any time during their sentence. Institutional heads typically authorize escorted temporary absences. In certain instances, for offenders serving life sentences, authorization by the Parole Board of Canada is required.

Unescorted temporary absences are short-term releases to the community. The offender can leave the institution to go to a specific destination but goes on their own.  Longer absences are supervised by CSC parole officers who work in the community.

Most offenders can apply for unescorted temporary absences after serving one-sixth or six months of their sentence. Offenders in a maximum-security institution cannot apply for this type of release.

Work Release

Work release allows an incarcerated offender, whose risk is manageable, to work in the community on a voluntary or paid basis. Generally, offenders can apply for a work release after serving one-sixth or six months of their sentence. Offenders in maximum-security institutions cannot apply for work release.

Institutional heads have the authority to grant a work release for as long as 60 days. Regional deputy commissioners have the authority to grant a work release for as long as 120 days. Work releases are granted to carefully selected offenders who perform work and services that benefit the community such as painting, general repairs and maintenance of community centres or homes for the elderly. Work release is one of the first steps in the safe, gradual reintegration of offenders into society.

Warrant Expiry Date

An offender's warrant expiry date is the date their sentence is finished. Offenders serving a life sentence do not have a warrant expiry date. They will remain incarcerated or on parole in the community until the end of their life.

References

Commissioner's Directive 566-10, Urinalysis Testing

Commissioner's Directive 580, Discipline of Inmates

Commissioner's Directive 705-6, Correctional Planning and Criminal Profile

Commissioner's Directive 710-1, Progress Against the Correctional Plan

Commissioner's Directive 715-1, Community Supervision

Commissioner's Directive 730, Offender Program Assignments and Inmate Payments

Corrections and Conditional Release Act

Corrections and Conditional Release Regulations

Educational Programs

Education is important as it increases offenders' chances to successfully transition back into society. Improved literacy skills may improve an offender's ability to take part in correctional programs.

CSC's Education Programs:

The education process includes:

  1. a review of the initial education-related assessments
  2. individual education planning
  3. enrolment and participation in the delivery of education programs
  4. ongoing assessment of progress
  5. reporting

For more information, follow the link above to CSC's web page on this topic.

Employment Programs

CSC's employment program is called CORCAN. It provides offenders with employment and employability skills training while incarcerated, and for brief periods of time after they are released into the community. This is done through on-the-job and third-party certified vocational training that focuses on CSC's four business lines: Manufacturing, Textiles, Construction, and Services.

For more information, follow the link above to CSC's web page on this topic.

Indigenous Correctional Programs

Indigenous correctional programs are offered in most CSC institutions for men and all CSC institutions for women. Trained Indigenous correctional program officers are culturally-competent and deliver Indigenous correctional programs.

The Corrections and Conditional Release Act, Section 80 mandates CSC to deliver programs that meet the needs of Indigenous offenders or offenders who are sincerely engaged in the Indigenous culture/traditions.

CSC must consider Indigenous peoples' unique circumstances and experiences. CSC must take into account:

The programs also accept non-Indigenous offenders who follow Indigenous cultural traditions.

For more information, follow the link above to CSC's web page on this topic.

Information Guide for Victims: Offender Intake Assessment and Correctional Planning

Integrated Correctional Program Model

CSC has based the Integrated Correctional Program Model on models of what works in correctional rehabilitation, including cognitive-behavioural approaches. The integrated nature of the Integrated Correctional Program Model allows offenders to address all of their criminal behaviour under one program umbrella. This works because even if offenders have diverse patterns of offending and different criminal offences, the program focuses on:

For more information, follow the link above to CSC's web page on this topic.

Programs for Offenders

Privacy Act

Social Programs

CSC offers social programs to help offenders adjust to incarceration and prepare for community reintegration. We offer certain social programs nationally, while others may vary depending on institutional need and suitability.

Social programs help offenders make personal changes in their lives by encouraging them to learn about their strengths and areas that need improvement. They:

For more information, follow the link above to CSC's web page on this topic.

Women Offender Programs

Correctional programs for women are holistic. They provide a gender- and trauma-informed approach to address the specific needs of women. The programs focus on how an offender's behaviour can influence situations and relationships. Correctional programming offers a continuum of care, from admission to sentence expiry. The goal is for the offender to:

Indigenous women offenders, or women offenders who have expressed a sincere desire to follow Indigenous programming and spirituality, may choose to take part in the Indigenous stream of correctional programs, also known as the Circle of Care.

For more information, follow the link above to CSC's web page on this topic.

Information About Offender Releases

This infographic provides victims of federal offenders with information about the different types of offender releases.
Information About Offender Releases: Infographic

This infographic provides victims of federal offenders with information about the different types of offender releases.

  • The first type of release is Escorted Temporary Absences, which may be granted at anytime.
  • The second type of release is Unescorted Temporary Absences (UTA). Offenders must serve a portion of their sentence before being eligible to apply. Offenders serving life sentences are eligible to apply for a UTA three years before their full parole eligibility date.
  • Next, offenders may apply for a Work Release. This may be granted for a specified period of time for offenders to participate in work or community service outside the penitentiary.
  • The next type of eligibility is Day Parole. An offender is eligible to apply for day parole six months prior to full parole eligibility, or after serving six months, whichever is greater. Offenders serving a life sentence are eligible to apply for day parole three years before their full parole eligibility date.
  • Offenders can also apply for Full Parole after serving either one third of their sentence, or seven years, whichever is less.
  • The Criminal Code of Canada governs full parole eligibility for offenders serving life sentences.
  • The final type of release is Statutory Release, where after serving two thirds of their sentence, the final third is served in the community, under supervision. Offenders serving a life sentence are not eligible.

Victims of federal offenders

This infographic provides victims of federal offenders with information on the different services available to them from the Correctional Service of Canada.
Victims of Federal Offenders: Infographic

This infographic provides victims of federal offenders with information on the different services available to them from the Correctional Service of Canada.

The first section is titled "Register to receive". It lists the following information that victims can register to receive:

  • important dates and information throughout the duration of an offender's sentence
  • information on different types of absences, transfers, and releases
  • parole eligibility
  • information about the offender's correctional plan and progress
  • information about CSC's victim-offender mediation services

The next section is titled "Provide a statement to CSC and PBC". The text reads "Describe how an offender's crime has impacted you and any safety concerns you may have. This information is considered by the Correctional Service of Canada and the Parole Board of Canada throughout the offender's sentence."

The final section is titled "Connect through the Victims Portal" and lists the following ways you can use the Portal:

  • keep your contact information up to date so we can reach you
  • log into the secure portal at any time
  • request to observe a parole hearing, present a victim statement at a hearing, receive copies of parole decisions
  • manage your preferences for receiving information

For more information, visit: www.csc-scc.gc.ca/victims.

Preparing a Victim Statement

This infographic provides victims of federal offenders with information about preparing a victim statement for the Correctional Service of Canada.
Preparing a Victim Statement: Infographic

This infographic provides victims of federal offenders with information about preparing a victim statement for the Correctional Service of Canada.

The first section lists the four key priorities when submitting a victim statement to CSC:

  • Describe the ongoing impact that the offence has on your life.
  • Ask that the offender have no contact with you - while incarcerated or when released.
  • Tell us of any safety concerns you have.
  • Tell us if the offender's location matters to you. If so, you can ask that the offender not be permitted to go to specific places.

The second section provides tips for victims to consider when submitting their statement:

  • Submit your victim statement as soon as possible after you register.
  • The statement will be considered in decisions about the offender's location and release.
  • Tell us what is most important for us to know - at any time during an offender's sentence.
  • Statements must be shared with the offender - your personal information is not.

Victims can also choose to present a Victim Statement at a Parole Board of Canada hearing. To learn more about the role of victims at parole hearings, call toll-free 1-866-789-4636 or visit www.Canada.ca/en/parole-board/services/victims.

Victim Representative

Infographic: Victim Representative
Victim Representative: Infographic

What is a victim representative?

A person chosen by a victim to receive information about the offender on their behalf at anytime during the federal sentence.

Representatives can include:

  • friends, family members
  • faith group representatives,
  • an Elder,
  • lawyer
  • member of a police force
  • a community victim services organization
  • an employee from another level of government
  • or others

Why have a representative?

  • They receive notifications on your behalf which may help ease your state of mind.
  • They can share the information at a time that is right for you.
  • They know you and can help explain things clearly.
  • They may speak your language or be familiar with your culture.
  • You can work with someone you know and trust, which may give some comfort.

Steps to naming someone as your representative

  1. Ask the person if they will take on this role for you.
  2. Let the Correctional Service of Canada or the Parole Board of Canada know by mail, email, or directly through the Victims Portal.
  3. Once you have shared their contact information with us, your representative will be contacted to confirm their participation and contact preferences.
  4. Once your representative is confirmed, offender information will be directly provided to them.
  5. You can stop using a representative or name a new representative at anytime.

For more information:

Victims Portal https://victimsportal-portailvictimes.csc-scc.gc.ca

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