Federal Offender Population - 2013
Warrant of Committal Admissions - Aboriginal Offenders Footnote 1

Figure 1:

Between 2003/2004 and 2012/2013 new Warrant of Committal admissions to custody of Aboriginal offenders increased by almost 36% (from 797 to 1,080 offenders). However, the proportion of Aboriginal offenders within the overall admissions cohort increased slightly from 19% in 2003/2004 to about 21% in 2012/2013.

Overall Trends - Admissions: 

  • Between 2003/2004 and 2012/2013 new Warrant of Committal admissions to custody of Aboriginal offenders increased by almost 36% (from 797 to 1,080 offenders).  However, the proportion of Aboriginal offenders within the overall admissions cohort increased slightly from 19% in 2003/2004 to about 21% in 2012/2013.
  • The number of men Aboriginal offender admissions increased by 36% (from 737 to 1,002 offenders).
  • At the same time, the number of women Aboriginal offenders admitted into custody rose from 60 to 78 (a 30% increase).  However, relative to men Aboriginal offenders, the proportion of women Aboriginal offenders admitted remained the same at about 7% over this time period.

 Length of Sentence:

  • The number of new Warrant of Committal admissions for Aboriginal offenders with shorter sentences of less than 3 years increased by 29% from 411 offenders in 2003/2004 to 529 offenders in 2012/2013.  During this period, the relative proportion dropped slightly from 52% to 49%.
  • The number of Aboriginal offenders admitted with sentences between 3 and 6 years increased by 53% from 269 to 411 offenders.  At the same time, the proportion of Aboriginal offenders with sentences between 3 and 6 years increased from 34% to 38%.
  • The proportion of Aboriginal offenders serving longer sentences has not changed noticeably over the years.  During 2012/2013, 7% had sentences between 6 and 10 years.  About 6% of offenders were admitted to serve sentences of 10 years or more as well as indeterminate sentences (including life).

 Major Offence Categories:

  • The proportion of Aboriginal offenders admitted for a drug offence increased by 4 percentage points between 2003/2004 and 2012/2013 - from 10% of admissions (74 offenders) to 14% (151 offenders).
  • At the same time, the proportion of new admissions for robbery dropped from 21% (162 offenders) to 16% (169 offenders).
  • Aboriginal offender admissions for property offences (e.g., theft, fraud, break and enter) also dropped from 16% in 2003/2004 (125 offenders) to 12% in 2012/2013 (127 offenders).
  • In 2012/2013, the proportion of offenders admitted with homicide-related offences increased by 1 percentage point (to 9%) while that of offenders admitted with sex offences (15%) decreased by 1 percentage point (to 15%).

 Custody Rating (Custody Rating Scale):

  • Between 2003/2004 and 2012/2013 the proportions of Aboriginal offenders admitted with custody ratings of minimum (21%) and maximum (17%) security changed minimally.  However, the proportion of Aboriginal offenders rated as medium security decreased by 5 percentage points from 67% to 62%.
  • At the same time, the number of Aboriginal offenders rated as medium security increased from 534 to 673 offenders (an increase of 26%).
  • There was a 52% increase in the number of Aboriginal offenders admitted between 2003/2004 and 2012/2013 who were rated as minimum security (from 145 to 221 offenders).
  • The number of offenders rated as maximum security increased by 57% (from 117 to 184).

 Reintegration Potential:

  • In 2012/2013, 9% of offenders admitted to custody were assessed as high reintegration potential.  Forty-one percent were assessed as having medium reintegration potential.  The remaining 50% were assessed as having low reintegration potential.

Age:

  • During 2012/2013, just over 48% of Aboriginal offenders admitted to custody were less than 30 years of age.  This represents a decrease of 4 percentage points since 2003/2004.
  • The percentage of Aboriginal offenders who were aged 30 to 49 years (46%) and 50 years of age or over (6%) at the time of admission have not changed significantly over this timeframe. 

 Criminal Associations (from DFIA-RFootnote 2):

  • Between 2010/2011 and 2012/13, the percentage of admitted Aboriginal offenders who had mostly criminal friends remained stable at about 61%.
  • The percentage of Aboriginal offenders admitted into custody with an existing gang affiliation decreased slightly from 23% to 19%.

 Dynamic Factors (Needs from DFIA-RFootnote 2a):

  • During 2012/2013, 86% of Aboriginal offender admissions to custody were identified with a moderate or high need in the Personal/Emotional domain.  Substance Abuse needs were identified 82% of the time.  The Attitudes domain was identified in 76% of cases.  Seventy-two percent of Aboriginal offender admissions had Employment needs.  Next, 48% of offenders had Marital/Family issues and 36% had Community Functioning challenges.  Analysis indicated that these percentages have not changed significantly between 2010/2011 and 2012/2013.

Prepared by the Research Branch
Data Source: Data derived from tables in the Offender Management System (OMS) and were extracted on August 23, 2013.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Warrant of committal admissions include Aboriginal offenders admitted to custody serving a federal sentence between April 1st 2003 and March 31st 2013.

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Footnote 2

In September, 2009, CSC implemented a revised version of the DFIA with new scoring criteria.  As a result, comparisons of results before and after this date are not possible.

Return to footnote 2 Return to footnote 2a