Information for victims

CSC strives to provide victims with the information they need to have an effective voice in the federal correctional system. We want to make sure that victims are treated with compassion, fairness, and respect. You can provide information about an offender to CSC anonymously by calling 1-866-780-3784 any time of the day or night.

Services and information

Register as a victim

Victims do not automatically receive information about the offender who harmed them. A victim must first register with CSC to receive that information. Find out how to register and what kind of information victims receive.

Provide a victim statement

Victim statements allow you to express how an offender's crime has impacted your life. This can include relevant information about the offender along with any safety concerns you may have. Information in a victim statement is considered throughout the course of an offender's sentence.

Victims Portal

The Victims Portal is a simple, secure way to send and receive information from CSC and the Parole Board of Canada. Once signed up with a portal account, victims and/or their named representatives can access important information and services online.

Make a complaint

If you believe your rights under the Canadian Victim Bill of Rights have been infringed, violated or denied, you can make a complaint. Victims also have the right to make a complaint if they believe that their rights have not been respected.

Frequently asked questions

Find a collection of frequently asked questions. You will also find links to FAQs from other federal organizations that provide services to victims.

Legislation

Find information about Canadian legislation that governs the rights of victims.

Victim resources

Find a collection of resources for victims of crime. Find out more about our partners.

Contact information for Victim Services

Find contact information for our national and regional Victim Services offices.

Transcript for video - Government of Canada launches Communications and Outreach Strategy for victims of federal offenders

PS McCrimmon: Hello, my name is Karen McCrimmon, I'm the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness.

PS McCrimmon: Victims have an important role to play in the criminal justice system and we have been listening to your concerns.

PS McCrimmon: We are working harder than ever to support victims of federal offenders. All while making sure that we have a corrections system that holds offenders accountable.

PS McCrimmon: Within the public safety portfolio, the Correctional Service of Canada, the Parole Board of Canada, and the National Office for Victims work together to provide you with the information you are entitled to.

PS McCrimmon: Together, the Correctional Service and the Parole Board of Canada have over 8,000 registered victims.

PS McCrimmon: Victims are entitled to receive over 50 types of notifications.

PS McCrimmon: In 2018, victims received 160,000 pieces of information through over 90,000 contacts.

PS McCrimmon: Victims also presented over 300 statements at parole hearings.

PS McCrimmon: The National Office for Victims offers information and resources to support victims of federal offenders, and can answer questions about the criminal justice system.

PS McCrimmon: The Office holds roundtables and meets annually with victim stakeholders to discuss victims' rights, and how they can best serve them. (Information, Participation, Protection)

PS McCrimmon: So what's next?

PS McCrimmon: We're launching a communications and outreach strategy that will make it easier for you to get the information you need.

PS McCrimmon: This includes a centralized resource online.

PS McCrimmon: We are also looking at ways to improve communications between victims and the federal government.

PS McCrimmon: I look forward to working with you to bring about positive change for victims of federal offenders.

Transcript for video - Commissioner Anne Kelly's address to victims of federal offenders: Victims and Survivors of Crime Week

Commissioner Kelly: Hello, I'm Anne Kelly, Commissioner of the Correctional Service of Canada.

Commissioner Kelly: Today marks the beginning of Victims and Survivors of Crime Week. The goal of this very important week is to raise awareness about the issues facing victims and survivors and recognize their important role in our criminal justice system.

Commissioner Kelly: We have received a lot of questions in the past about victims' rights, how the correctional system works, and what information victims of federal offenders are entitled to.

Commissioner Kelly: I have met with a number of victims and value the opportunity to hear from you.

Commissioner Kelly: I also know that more can and must be done to communicate better with you.

Commissioner Kelly: That is why I am pleased that the Correctional Service of Canada has launched a communications and outreach strategy that will make it easier for you to get the information you have a right to.

Commissioner Kelly: I hope you follow us on social media as we are looking to further engage with victims through this and other ways.

Commissioner Kelly: Thank you very much and I look forward to working together.

Victims of federal offenders' infographic
Victims of federal offenders' infographic

This infographic provides victims of federal offenders with information on the different services available to them from the Correctional Service of Canada.

The first section is titled "Register to receive". It lists the following information that victims can register to receive:

  • important dates and information throughout the duration of an offender's sentence
  • information on different types of absences, transfers, and releases
  • parole eligibility
  • information about the offender's correctional plan and progress
  • information about CSC's victim-offender mediation services

The next section is titled "Provide a statement to CSC and PBC". The text reads "Describe how an off­ender's crime has impacted you and any safety concerns you may have. This information is considered by the Correctional Service of Canada and the Parole Board of Canada throughout the offender's sentence."

The final section is titled "Connect through the Victims Portal" and lists the following ways you can use the Portal:

  • keep your contact information up to date so we can reach you
  • log into the secure portal at any time
  • request to observe a parole hearing, present a victim statement at a hearing, receive copies of parole decisions
  • manage your preferences for receiving information

For more information, visit: www.csc-scc.gc.ca/victims.

Information about offender releases infographic
Information about offender releases infographic

This infographic provides victims of federal offenders with information about the different types of offender releases.

  • The first type of release is Escorted Temporary Absences, which may be granted at anytime.
  • The second type of release is Unescorted Temporary Absences (UTA). Offenders must serve a portion of their sentence before being eligible to apply. Offenders serving life sentences are eligible to apply for a UTA three years before their full parole eligibility date.
  • Next, offenders may apply for a Work Release. This may be granted for a specified period of time for offenders to participate in work or community service outside the penitentiary.
  • The next type of eligibility is Day Parole. An offender is eligible to apply for day parole six months prior to full parole eligibility, or after serving six months, whichever is greater. Offenders serving a life sentence are eligible to apply for day parole three years before their full parole eligibility date.
  • Offenders can also apply for Full Parole after serving either one third of their sentence, or seven years, whichever is less.
  • The Criminal Code of Canada governs full parole eligibility for offenders serving life sentences.
  • The final type of release is Statutory Release, where after serving two thirds of their sentence, the final third is served in the community, under supervision. Offenders serving a life sentence are not eligible.
Preparing a Victim Statement for the Correctional Service of Canada
Preparing a Victim Statement for the Correctional Service of Canada

This infographic provides victims of federal offenders with information about preparing a victim statement for the Correctional Service of Canada.

The first section lists the four key priorities when submitting a victim statement to CSC:

  • Describe the ongoing impact that the offence has on your life.
  • Ask that the offender have no contact with you - while incarcerated or when released.
  • Tell us of any safety concerns you have.
  • Tell us if the offender's location matters to you. If so, you can ask that the offender not be permitted to go to specific places.

The second section provides tips for victims to consider when submitting their statement:

  • Submit your victim statement as soon as possible after you register.
  • The statement will be considered in decisions about the offender's location and release.
  • Tell us what is most important for us to know - at any time during an offender's sentence.
  • Statements must be shared with the offender - your personal information is not.

Victims can also choose to present a Victim Statement at a Parole Board of Canada hearing. To learn more about the role of victims at parole hearings, call toll-free 1-866-789-4636 or visit www.Canada.ca/en/parole-board/services/victims.

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